Leadership on the Horizon: Rocking the Boat Without Falling Out

Open to the Public

Click here to register

The Center for Collaborative Leadership is pleased to announce the launch of a four part leadership speaker series: Leadership on the Horizon. This series will offer insights and tools needed as managers and leaders consider how to harness the unique skills and talents of their workforce as competitive advantage in the ever-changing business environment.

The second offering of the series is Rocking the Boat Without Falling Out: Creating positive change at work in partnership with Lois Kelly and Carmen Medina of Rebels at Work. Rocking the Boat Without Falling Out will be held on November 6th from 8:00am-12:00pm at the Seaport Hotel

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Creating change at work is hard work, requiring a mindset and competencies rarely taught in business schools or in the workplace. In this three-hour hands-on session Lois Kelly and Carmen Medina, authors of the new book Rebels at Work: A Handbook for Leading Change from Within, will guide you in learning how to:

  • Be a more effective change maker, helping people to see the value of your ideas and working through the often-messy steps of getting them adopted
  • Lead and develop the creative rebels in your organization, enabling them to help the organization grow and thrive vs. discredited as troublemakers
  • Develop some of the essential competencies needed to lead change and foster an engaged, collaborative, and successful workplace



Price for the session is $350/participant. Only 40 seats are available for this timely workshop. Early bird discount and package special expires 10/22. Other discounts available to groups of 3 or more. 


Sponsored by:

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Hosted by:
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Affecting Positive Change in the Workplace: For success in life and leadership

The Center for Collaborative Leadership is pleased to announce the upcoming leadership webinar series, Affecting Positive Change in the Workplace: For Success in Life and Leadership.

Office culture has a huge impact on our lives. Do you work in a positive environment, negative environment, or somewhere in between? A negative environment can have many negative implications – not just for work, but for your health and happiness as well.

Have you ever thought to yourself, “I don’t know how much longer I can take this job! My boss is difficult, my direct reports are unmotivated, I work long hours with little appreciation… it is time to move on.” Is moving on the solution, or can you be the change agent that makes a difference in your workplace? 

What can you do, as a leader, to affect positivity in the workplace, both for yourself, and for those you manage? This webinar series will address several topics designed to give you tools and tips to incorporate emotional and physical well-being into the workplace and make it the cultural norm.

The series includes learning about emotional intelligence; building trust; giving constructive feedback; increasing your optimism and in turn, optimism in those around you; and culminates with a webinar on understanding how the brain works to shift how we lead and how we build our organizations.

Join us for the following dates:

October 29, 2014Emotional Intelligence: What is it and how can it benefit you? facilitated by Jackie Ramirez of Genos
December 2, 2014Leaders and Emotional Intelligence: Inspiring performance through trust and courage facilitated by Chuck Wolfe of Charles J. Wolfe Associates
January 28, 2015Team Emotional Intelligence facilitated by Steve Wolff and Vanessa Druskat of the Emotional Intelligence Consortium
February 25, 2015Ouch that Hurts: Neurobiology of Giving Feedback facilitated by Ken Nowack of Envisia Learning
March 25, 2015Seeing the Glass Half-Full: Increasing Your Optimism at Work facilitated by Ceridian Corporation
May 20, 2015Brain Science and Leadership: How can the latest information about the brain make us better leaders? facilitated by Jen Cohen of Seven Stones Leadership

 

Leadership on the Horizon: Managing Millennials

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Managing Millennials Workshop

On October 9th the Center for Collaborative Leadership launched the first session of their four-part speaker series: Leadership on the Horizon. This series offers insights and tools needed as managers and leaders consider how to harness the unique skills and talents of their workforce as competitive advantage in the ever-changing business environment.

The first session was Managing Millennials, facilitated by Curt Garbett of FranklinCovey. Did you know there are four generations working side by side in the workplace? This timely workshop raised awareness of why each of the generations behaves the ways that they do, and helped participants understand the generational differences. One attendee wrote: as a Millennial myself, it was interesting to identify and dissect my generation in comparison to the generations I work with on a daily basis. The end result is that participants now have the tools to diagnose some of the challenges that arise from these differences and apply skills to make positive decisions, especially when working with Millennials.

Join us for the next part of the series on November 6th, called Rocking the Boat Without Falling Out: Creating positive change at work. It is based on the soon to be released book, Unleashing the Rebels in the Workplace. This session will be another half day workshop facilitated by authors Lois Kelly and Carmen Medina, who formed the group, Rebels at Work. In this workshop they will guide participants to be effective change makers, to lead and develop the creative rebels within an organization, and to develop essential competencies needed to lead change and foster an engaged, collaborative, and successful workplace.


Managing Millennials was Sponsored by:

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Event host:

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Center for Collaborative Leadership Welcomes Dean Jorge Haddock to Boston

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Felix Arroyo with Jorge Haddock

On October 7th the Center for Collaborative Leadership hosted a reception welcoming Dean Jorge Haddock to the College of Management at the University of Massachusetts Boston.  Dean Haddock comes to Boston from George Mason University, where for four years he served as dean of the School of Management. The gathering served to introduce Dr. Haddock to key leaders across the region and allowed him to share his thoughts on how the College of Management can best support the region’s continued growth and efforts to build more inclusive communities.

In his remarks, Dean Haddock thanked the center for the opportunity to meet Boston area business leaders, noting the uniqueness of the multi-sector community of businesses, government agencies and nonprofits in this area. He stated, “It is about maximizing our opportunities for partnerships to increase our institutions’ competitiveness, productivity and efficiency. It is creating a common vision and purpose. It’s about collaboration.”

Among the guests were notable leaders such as Felix Arroyo, Carol Fulp, Rick Kelleher, Dani Monroe and Jeff Pike. In addition, several members of the center’s board attended as well, including: Joe Bator, Victor Carballo, William “Mo” Cowan, José Massó, Kenneth Montgomery, Nathan Pusey and Craig Williams.

13th Annual Changing the Face of Leadership Luncheon Highlights

Thu, Jun 26, 2014 - 3:12 pm

June 20, 2014

Click here to see pictures

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John Fish, Keynote Speaker

The University of Massachusetts Boston Center for Collaborative Leadership celebrated the graduation of the 2014 Emerging Leaders fellows on June 20th at the Seaport World Trade Center.  This group of 34 emerging leaders from the corporate, nonprofit and government sectors started the program in September 2013 and had monthly leadership forums through April 2014. In the program, fellows participate in leadership skill sessions facilitated by top experts in the field, dialogue with Boston’s current leaders, and participate in an experiential team project.

Keynote speaker was John F. Fish, chairman and CEO of Suffolk Construction Company. As a successful business leader, Fish lives by the Biblical proverb, “To whom much is given, much is expected,” however, he spoke of how the road to his success was not a walk down easy street. Fish struggled with severe dyslexia throughout his childhood, but it is clear he did not allow this disability to define what he could be.

Today he is transforming the construction industry by investing in people through innovation, stating, “People, innovation, and community; those are our core strategies.” And this strategy is paying off. Recently the Boston Business Journal named Suffolk Construction 2nd in best places to work (just behind mega-innovator Microsoft).

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Ron Bell, Award Recipient

At the luncheon, the center also honored community activist Ron Bell, an Emerging Leaders Program alumnus from the class of 2005, with the second annual Leading the Way Award. In accepting the award, Bell started by quoting Frederick Douglass, saying, “We are one, our cause is one, and we must help each other if we are to succeed.”

Saying it again, he let that quote sink in to the collective audience of established leaders, emerging leaders, and everyone in between.

“Today’s problems are so deep and so complex that we can’t have just one leader. It’s going to take many leaders – black, white, Latino, men and women - from different sectors of our community, working together to have an impact,” he said.

That is the collaborative leadership model espoused by the Emerging Leaders Program, and that is the model that Bell will continue to embrace to help make Boston a better city.

Additional speakers included Larry Moulter, Center for Collaborative Leadership executive in residence; J. Keith Motley, University of Massachusetts Boston chancellor; and Nathan E. Pusey of Commerce Bank, the Center for Collaborative Leadership board chair.

ELP Alum Derek Morris Presents at the UN

October 17, 2014 was the World Day for the Eradication of Poverty. Members from the UMass Boston Center for Social Policy (CSP), Fourth World Movement, and the Emerging Leaders Program (ELP) attended the event at the UN. Kaidi Kenyatta, CSP Constituent Advisor, and Derek Morris, alumnus of the Emerging Leaders Program spoke at the event. Derek is the director of operations at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. In 2013, as a fellow in the ELP, he was a member of a team working with the CSP and the Fourth World Movement, and to this day, he has stayed involved. He says, “The people involved with the 4th World Movement are amazingly dedicated people. They are the heroes that not a lot of people get to see or hear about. The selflessness and self-sacrifice they display all in the name of eradicating poverty on a daily basis is really inspirational. It’s hard to find the right words to express what they do. The whole experience was amazing, humbling, and impactful and I look forward to working with them in the future.”

Recap of the 2014 Emerging Leaders Program Team Project Presentation

Wed, Jun 4, 2014 - 8:53 am

Lessons from Lived Experience: From fresh insights to effective action

June 4, 2014

Read the Executive Summary
View the presentation slides

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Audience listening to 2014 Team Project
On June 4 members of the 2014 Emerging Leaders Program presented to a group of stakeholders about their findings for team projects they worked on for the past 9 months. The presenters were: Richard Boyajian, RBS Citizens; Jessica Desrosiers, Partners Community Healthcare Inc.; Kenechukwu Anadu, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston; Ryan Morrison, RBS Citizens; Steve Record, Massachusetts Eye & Ear; and Laura Cullen, Comcast.

The fellows worked with six community partners, giving their time and professional skills to understand how to frame complex social challenges, engage new partners and resources, and sharpen strategic plans. The six project sponsors were: Massachusetts Business Roundtable, Center for Social Policy at UMass Boston, Hospitality Homes, Commonwealth Diversity Fellows Program, Emerging Leaders Program, and the Center for Collaborative Leadership.

A guest panel responded to the findings. They were: Josh Zakim,  Boston City Councillor; Craig Williams, Tufts Medical Center; Leslie Lewis, Brightcove, Inc.; David Waters, Community Servings; and Alan Fein, Broad Institute. Tim Sullivan, Chief of Staff for Intergovernmental Relations/Senior Advisor to the Mayor for External Affairs for the City of Boston provided closing remarks.

Webinar: Demystifying Golf: What you want to know about golf but are too afraid to ask

Thu, May 22, 2014 - 12:38 pm

May 22, 2014

Did you miss the live webinar? Check out the recording!

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Learn Golf Basics

On May 22, Andrea Wight, assistant director of the Center for Collaborative Leadership and Johanna Storella, chief strategy officer at the Massachusetts Convention Center Authority, co-facilitated the Demystifying Golf webinar. Their presentation prepared the beginner golfer with information about what to expect on the course, as well as provide helpful tips for playing with weekend warriors.

One attendee wrote, “Thank you for hosting the Demystifying Golf webinar.  I really enjoyed it!  It was interesting, informative and easy to follow. The webinar addressed issues/topics that I recognized but wouldn’t have known how to ask an experienced golfer about because, for instance, I was unfamiliar with simple terminology like “ready golf” or too intimidated to ask about the score card. Aside from terminology, the etiquette lessons were great - you just have to know how to behave on the golf course.” 

In case you missed the presentation, please register to view the recorded webinar, or you can download the slides.

The Facilitators:
Andrea Wight, assistant director of the Center for Collaborative Leadership is a weekend warrior. She has been playing golf on a regular basis for the past seven years. Her first few times out were intimidating. She made plenty of avoidable mistakes, if she had only known then what she knows now.

Johanna Storella, chief strategy officer at the Massachusetts Convention Center plays about dozen times a year. She started playing golf at the age of 15 when her father took her out on the course for the first time, patiently taught her how to swing a club and explained the most important aspect of the game, etiquette.

UMass Boston Appoints Former BostonCoach CEO as Executive in Residence

Mon, Mar 10, 2014 - 9:09 am

See coverage in Boston.com

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Larry Moulter

(Boston, March 14, 2014) — Former BostonCoach CEO Lawrence (Larry) Moulter has been appointed as the first-ever Executive in Residence at the Center for Collaborative Leadership based in UMass Boston’s College of Management. Moulter begins his new role on Monday, March 17.

UMass Boston Chancellor J. Keith Motley said he is pleased to have Moulter join the team, stating, “Larry is part of the who’s who in Greater Boston. His know-how and connections will help strengthen the already distinctive position of the Center for Collaborative Leadership in the region.” 

Moulter served as BostonCoach CEO from 2008 to 2013. During his tenure the recession caused him to rescale and reposition BostonCoach, helping them to recover as a smaller and more profitable business. He may be best known for his role as the Chairman and CEO of the New Boston Garden Corporation, where he was the lead executive for the development of a new Boston Garden — the first person to do so in 68 years.

Moulter is enthusiastic about joining UMass Boston. He says, “My career has been built on the desire to not only be an effective executive, but to also become the best possible leader; a leader who understands that change is good, that relationships are important and that people can make a difference in their communities. I am fortunate to be partnering not only with the center’s leadership who share these same goals, but also with the chancellor, provost, and the deans who every day make a difference in the lives of UMass Boston students.”

Webinar – Reinventing You: Define Your Brand, Imagine Your Future

Thu, Feb 20, 2014 - 11:17 am

March 12, 2014

Did you miss the live webinar? Check out the recording!

On March 12th Dorie Clark, author of the new Harvard Business Review Press book “Reinventing You: Define Your Brand, Imagine Your Future,” discussed concrete strategies to help attendees thrive and succeed amidst today’s rapidly changing professional environment. Dorie talked about identifying your unique leverage, creating a compelling narrative, mobilizing mentors on your behalf, and building your credibility.  Attendees also heard from two readers of Reinventing You, Blair Hughes and Mark Weber, who explained how they made powerful changes in their own professional lives by applying the concepts of the book.

One attendee in her review of the webinar wrote, “I learned the importance of seeking input, support, and feedback from others in helping you define your image. It was so nice to hear stories of how people used Dorie’s methodology to make it real.” 

 

 

Author Liz O’Donnell Discusses her book Mogul, Mom & Maid

Tue, Jan 21, 2014 - 12:30 pm

February 24, 2014

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Mogul, Mom & Maid

The Center for Collaborative Leadership hosted an informative session to further the discussion on family friendly work practices, featuring the author of Mogul, Mom & Maid: The Balancing Act of the Modern Woman, Liz O’Donnell of Hello Ladies. Moderating the panel was Lisa Murray of RBS Citizens, and panelists included Nancy Cremins, Partner at Gestmer Updergove LLP; Nadia McKay, President of Mom Corps - Boston; Jean Serra, Co-founder, Version 2.0 Communications; and Cheryl Stober, Vice President and Bank Loan Product Manager at Loomis, Sayles & Company.

The Center for Collaborative Leadership would like to thank RBS Citizens for sponsoring this event.

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UMass Boston Center for Collaborative Leadership Honors Eastern Bank CEO

Mon, Jan 6, 2014 - 12:13 pm


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Richard E. Holbrook accepting the award from William “Mo” Cowan More photos >>

February 11, 2014

The UMass Boston Center for Collaborative Leadership proudly hosted its second annual Building a Better Boston award breakfast on February 10. The honoree this year was Richard E. Holbrook, Chairman and CEO of Eastern Bank. Prior to Holbrook accepting the award, University of Massachusetts Boston Chancellor J. Keith Motley opened the award ceremony stating Richard Holbrook’s leadership gives us good reason to celebrate. Presenting the award to Holbrook was last year’s recipient, William “Mo” Cowan, COO of ML Strategies. In his remarks Cowan stated “Eastern Bank has a history of socially conscientious leadership” that demonstrates generosity and impact.

Under Holbrook’s leadership, Eastern Bank has begun to focus a portion of philanthropic efforts around certain themes of current need. These have included homelessness, workforce development, and this year, K-12 education. Through this focus Holbrook hopes to achieve greater focus on these topics, and to inspire others to think about and collaborate with them in addressing some of these critical social needs.

In his acceptance speech, Holbrook stated Eastern Bank “exists solely to serve our customers, our employees, and our communities. If we collaborate with and give back to our communities, and if we serve our customers by providing the best possible level of service and value, and if we treat our employees with respect and dignity, then all three of our stakeholders will thrive.  And interestingly, so will our bank. And it has.”

He further went on to say that the award validates one of the fundamental values that has driven Eastern Bank for almost 200 years.  The award “recognizes the efforts of hundreds of Eastern Bankers, who live and work and raise their families in our communities, and who share the vision of making those communities stronger and healthier and safer for all of us.” Holbrook thanked those in the room for allowing Eastern Bank to collaborate on efforts to build a better Boston.

Collaboration that propels our region forward was the theme, as Mayor of Boston Marty Walsh addressed the room, noting that it was great to see nonprofit and government leaders in the room with business leaders. “This type of collaboration can’t be the exception, it has to be the rule” he said. For more than a decade, the Center for Collaborative Leadership has led the way for cross sector collaboration through the Emerging Leaders Program.


Proudly sponsored by:
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Is Your Personal Brand in Alignment with the Real You?

Wed, Dec 11, 2013 - 11:11 am

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Rachel Gogos, brandiD

The Center for Collaborative Leadership hosted a webinar on December 12 featuring ELP alum and brand expert Rachel Gogos. Her presentation titled: Is your Personal Brand in Alignment with the Real You generated some thought provoking questions, as well as provided attendees with the tools and resources they can use to find that alignment. Luckily, we recorded it. For those of you who want to learn more about the brandiD alignment framework, take the time to view the recording.

About the webinar: We think we know ourselves really well, but we often “show up” differently in our various life situations. Sometimes there is a good reason for the discrepancy, but in other moments we’re being who we think we should be versus who we really are. How can you act authentically in all areas of your life? Is it even possible? And, is living authentically leading to, or, getting in the way of your success?

About the facilitator: Rachel is a serial-entrepreneur with a passion for people, the web and creating strong personal brands. From her career start at United Nations headquarters in New York city - where she helped create the look and feel for the organization’s first website - to her current role, Rachel channels over 15 years of marketing and communications experience into each and every one of brandiD’s clients. Rachel is an alum of the 2003 cohort of the Emerging Leaders Program.

Lisa DeAngelis Provides her Leadership Expertise to Multinational Corporation

Tue, Nov 26, 2013 - 5:44 pm

November 2013

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Lisa DeAngelis

Lisa DeAngelis, director of the Center for Collaborative Leadership, has been part of a team of Authentic Leadership Institute trained consultants working with Harvard Business School to deliver a customized executive development offering for the leadership team of a multinational corporation.  This work included individual and group coaching sessions, 360 interviews and feedback, and the creation of leadership development plans for each of the senior leaders participating in the program.

Eastern Bank Steps Up to Develop Nonprofit Leaders at UMass Boston

Wed, Oct 9, 2013 - 1:17 pm

October 9, 2013

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Janey Tallarida

As a leader in corporate social responsibility, the Eastern Bank Charitable Foundation has stepped up to become one of the founding corporate partners of the Sherry H. Penney Partners in the Community Fund, which enables foundations to further the sustainability of their nonprofit partners.

The bank’s donation of $7,000 has enabled Janey Tallarida, human resources and development manager of the Irish International Immigrant Center (IIIC), to be a fellow in the 2014 cohort of the Emerging Leaders Program (ELP) at the UMass Boston Center for Collaborative Leadership.

“Eastern Bank is proud to support organizations providing workforce development training and giving local professionals the skills they need to advance their careers,” said Laura Kurzrok, Executive Director, Eastern Bank Charitable Foundation.  “I’ve had the pleasure of working with Janey for many years and wish her the best of luck.  I commend UMass Boston for its efforts in this critical area.”

Tallarida is extremely grateful to Eastern Bank for giving her the chance to be a fellow. “This opportunity will enable me to further develop my own leadership skills at a time of growth for the IIIC. I look forward to working with a great group of leaders over the next nine months and learning as much as I can from the program,” Tallarida said.

A key component of the Emerging Leaders Program is building the capacity for cross sector networking. In recent years, with scarce resources for professional development in the nonprofit sector, the center has seen a drop in the number of applicants from this sector. Rather than hope that things will get better, the center turned to its key corporate partners to create the Sherry H. Penney Partners in the Community Fund.

The ELP helps emerging leaders develop the types of collaborative leadership skills that they will require to not only to address issues in their organizations, but also to address the civic issues in the region.  Lisa DeAngelis, director at the center notes, “We hear from current leaders and from the emerging leaders themselves that collaborative leadership skills are a vitally needed resource for societies.”

Earlier this year State Street Corporation contributed to the fund and sponsored Beth Miller, director of development and external relations of the Boston Debate League for the 2014 cohort. The Center for Collaborative Leadership’s goal is the development of an ongoing fund whereby contributing organizational partners can designate their nonprofit partners to acquire the benefits of participating in the Emerging Leaders Program.

If you are interested in becoming a donor to the Sherry H. Penney Partners in the Community Fund, please contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Emerging Leaders Program 2014 Cohort Completes Week One

Sun, Sep 15, 2013 - 8:43 am

September 16, 2013

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Ive Gonzalez of Eastern Bank discussing team project

The 2014 cohort of the Emerging Leaders Program completed week one of the 9 month program. Fellows heard from Boston’s top leaders including: William “Mo” Cowan, Visiting Fellow at the Harvard University Institute of Politics; José Massó, III, Communications Director, Massport; Crystal Johnson, Principal and Founder, Integrative Sustainability and Environmental Solutions (ISES); Nathan Pusey, Marketplace Director, Citibank; Christopher McIntosh, Publisher, Boston Business Journal; Eric Beyer, President and CEO, Tufts Medical Center; Hubie Jones, Social Justice Entrepreneur in Residence, City Year; and Jim Rooney, Executive Director, MCCA.

In addition they learned valuable leadership skills from experts in the fields of strategic networking, branding, delegation, objectivity, and conflict resolution. Skill speakers included Elizabeth Thornton of Babson College, Dorie Clark of Clark Communications, Juliette Mayers of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, and Eben Weitzman of UMass Boston.

The 2014 cohort will join the 489 emerging leader alums—a group of emerging leaders that enhances the available talent pool and answers the concern that we need more skilled leaders. As they network with each other and with current leaders and hone skills in teamwork, they will start to assume leadership roles of increasing responsibility in this community.

12th Annual Changing the Face of Leadership Luncheon Highlights

Wed, Jun 26, 2013 - 9:17 am

June 21, 2013

The University of Massachusetts Boston Center for Collaborative Leadership celebrated the graduation of the 2013 Emerging Leaders fellows on June 21st at the Marriott Copley Boston Hotel.

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Dr. Kerry Healey. See more pictures.

Our keynote speaker was Dr. Kerry Healey, President-elect of Babson College. She spoke about her career path from her days of researching and writing reports to her move to politics. The shift came about with the realization that the reports were not the vehicle she thought they would be to implement change. In politics she was “able to genuinely have a positive impact on the issues” she cared most about. Healey eventually left politics to focus on entrepreneurial initiatives. She recognized that “in politics, there are limits,” and she is excited about her future as the leader of Babson College where she will be surrounded by 2000 people who want to be entrepreneurs. She closed by advising the 2013 cohort to maintain this newly developed network of broad connections and by letting them know that she will be looking to them to do great things.

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Joe McGrail

At the luncheon, we honored the memory of Joe Morrissey ‘05 with the inaugural Leading the Way Award. Joe McGrail of State Street Corporation presented the award with a heartfelt tribute to Joe Morrissey. The two had a very close working relationship, and McGrail provided special insight into Joe as a dedicated team member who was on track to excel to higher levels at State Street Corporation, as well as a friend, a leader, and a co-conspirator of Friday afternoon mischief. The award was presented to the “South Shore Men’s Club,” a group of three of Joe’s fellow 2005 classmates who formed a close bond through the Emerging Leaders Program. David Howse, Marc Lucas, and Greg Wilmot each expressed the impact Joe had on their lives, and how much his loss is felt by his family and friends. They reminisced about their time in the ELP and about the times they met to have breakfast at Newcomb Farms. A special thank you to Joe’s wife Cristina, his 2 children Tristan and Samuel, his father Frank, his sister Diana, his mother-in-law Maria, his aunt Casslyn and his close friends Dan, Sean and Robert for being our guests of honor and allowing us to pay tribute to a great leader.

UMass Boston Fellows Take Honed Leadership Skills Back to Public, Private Sectors

June 7, 2013

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Cristen Monaco Shields (Presenter) | More pictures

When you think of the Girl Scouts, you probably think of cookies. Geoff Phillips and the other fellows in his Emerging Leaders Program (ELP) group have spent the last nine months making sure users’ experiences with the Girl Scouts’ website is equally as satisfying.

Fellows in UMass Boston’s Center for Collaborative Leadership’s Emerging Leaders Program presented the results of their nine-month-long projects with the following project sponsors on Friday: the Girl Scouts of Eastern Massachusetts, Massachusetts Business Roundtable, Science from Scientists, the Children’s Trust Fund, UMass Boston’s Center for Social Policy, and the Center for Collaborative Leadership. The presentations were followed by thoughts from a guest panel and a question-and-answer session with the 2013 cohort.

Phillips’ group analyzed focus group results and conversations with staff, parents, and volunteers and suggested navigation and design changes to the Girl Scouts’ website.

“The challenges that they faced with their website were not new to them. What we were able to do was basically focus their attention on the key areas of the website that they should improve first, and what areas they should do in the longer term,” said Phillips, a product and marketing strategist at Northeast Utilities Energy Efficiency Services.

Another group looked at the viability of affinity groups, groups formed around shared interest, for their project sponsor, the Children’s Trust Fund (CTF). CTF seeks to eliminate child abuse and strengthen families in Massachusetts.

“I think it’s really important relative to collaboration and also how we coordinate our efforts that best use our resources, because one of the things we find in the nonprofit sector is sometimes, although folks are well-meaning, we have folks who may fight over resources and not coordinate in the best way, so I’m really encouraged by the work that your ‘e doing in that space,” said Boston City Councilor Tito Jackson, a member of the guest panel.

A third group prepared a report showing the strengths, weaknesses, and opportunities for Science from Scientists, a Boston-based nonprofit that brings scientists into elementary classrooms to get students interested in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields. David Christensen, a sales executive at AT&T, talked about how his group made recommendations around capitalizing on the nonprofit’s niche offerings.

Stephen Meunier, associate director of public affairs for Genzyme, which has funded both the Girl Scouts and Science from Scientists, acknowledged that getting youngsters to understand what scientists do can be difficult.

“We’re a company of scientists. I wouldn’t call them rock stars, but here in eastern Massachusetts they’re more likely to be your neighbor—the mom or dad next door. I think, how can we steer young people into a career as a scientist if they think, ‘Oh, that requires being a little bit crazy, [like a mad scientist with crazy hair and a lab coat],’” Meunier said.

“Science is no longer an internal thing done in your own lab. It’s international, it’s national. It’s networking, and so seeing that being done today was really, really cool. It’s also, I think, incredibly critical for issues today. Nothing is solitary,” added Juanita Urban-Rich, associate professor of zooplankton ecology in UMass Boston’s School for the Environment, during the panel discussion.

Cristin Monaco Shields, senior project manager at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, said her group, which worked with the Massachusetts Business Roundtable to examine supply chain relationships between large and small businesses, learned to draw on and value the strengths of the team members throughout the ELP process.

“We struggled with how to we make this [team project] big enough to be exciting, yet small enough to be meaningful, so the way we battled through that was to stay in really close contact with each other, keep all ideas on the table, and work really close with our sponsor company to make sure that what we were coming up with matched what they were asking us to do,” Shields said.

Aside from the lessons learned while working with a project sponsor, fellows in the program came away with a better understanding about themselves as leaders.

“The thing that I take back to Harvard Pilgrim Healthcare is to level the playing field. Everyone, from the most experienced to the least experienced, has something to share, contribute, and lead on a team. And so I want to make sure that I empower everyone around me to step up and give them a safe space to feel like they can show off their talents and elevate themselves in a team environment,” said fellow Beth Creavin, the director of financial reporting at Harvard Pilgrim Healthcare.

“I have more confidence. I’m able to lean in a little bit more and speak up and voice my opinion, and I have more courage to take action than I did before I went through the Emerging Leaders Program,” said fellow Katie Hauser, director of publications and digital communications for the Massachusetts Convention Center Authority.

Senator Mo Cowan Receives Award from UMass Boston Center for Collaborative Leadership

Tue, May 7, 2013 - 10:09 am

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Senator Cowan Receiving the Award from Robert Popeo of Mintz Levin. More pictures >>

On May 6, 2013, the UMass Boston Center for Collaborative Leadership presented Interim Senator William “Mo” Cowan with their inaugural Building a Better Boston Award. The concept for the award originated in 2007 when an Emerging Leaders Program team was charged with helping to identify ways for Boston to retain young professionals. Their recommendation was to create awards recognizing individuals who have improved the community.  Their research suggested that young professionals would have more faith in the organizations they work for and the region by seeing these efforts receiving public recognition. The Center took up the mantle this year with the Building a Better Boston Award.

The Center selected Senator Cowan for the award because he is widely recognized for his contributions to advancing the region through his work as a convener and collaborator.  Lisa DeAngelis, director of the center opened the ceremony by explaining, “the Building a Better Boston Award enables us to showcase for our fellows a current leader who is demonstrating the impact of collaborative leadership.”

Aside from all of his contributions as former chief of staff to Governor Deval Patrick, Senator Cowan is known for his work as a mentor to young black professionals looking to succeed in the City of Boston and to his service on many nonprofit boards such as Northeastern University Corporation, Discovering Justice Foundation, Roxbury Preparatory Charter School, the Chestnut Hill School, Project STEP, Boston Bar Association, Boston Bar Foundation, Boston Lawyers Group, Victim Rights Law Center, Volunteer Lawyers Project, and the Center for Collaborative Leadership at UMass Boston, all of which validates his devotion to the community while building a better Boston.

Robert Popeo, chairman of Mintz Levin presented the award to Cowan stating, “from the start, Cowan was a role model for the law firm” when he worked there. He also noted that Cowan always had a passion for public service, and that led him to his decision to leave Mintz Levin to serve as Governor Patrick’s Chief Legal Counsel.

For his part, Senator Cowan displayed humility upon accepting the award. He humorously suggested that he probably was selected for this award in the same way he was selected as Interim Senator. He stated, “I see many faces in this room that I recognize, each of whom should be the recipients of this award in the years to come. Each of us has the potential to be a leader. If we foster and support others, it can blossom, just like the Center for Collaborative Leadership is doing, we can build a stronger city.”

Cowan noted that small acts define true leadership, as we saw in the wake of the marathon bombings. “We saw plain folk running toward the blast zone, carting the injured to safety to save lives.” Cowan concluded that “together, we can do a lot.”

University of Massachusetts Boston Chancellor J. Keith Motley wrapped up the event by reading a letter from Governor Deval Patrick, in which he writes, “Senator Cowan has long been a trusted friend, colleague and advisor. His wisdom, perspective and sound judgment have made him a valued ally to our work on behalf of the residents of the Commonwealth. I can think of no better person to receive the inaugural Building a Better Boston Award than Senator Cowan, and I thank him for his continued service to our community.”

Founding Director Awarded the Status of Professor Emerita

Tue, Feb 19, 2013 - 10:38 am

February 2013

The Center’s founding director, Sherry Penney, has been awarded the status of Professor Emerita at the University of Massachusetts Boston in recognition of her teaching, scholarship, and service. In their letter of award, Chancellor J. Keith Motley and Provost Winston Langley wrote:

You are held in high esteem among your peers for your contributions to the development of emerging business leaders; your impact on UMass Boston, first as its Chancellor (1988-1995; 1996-2000) and then from 2001 as Sherry H. Penney Professor in Leadership and Director of CM’s Center for Collaborative Leadership has been transformative. In 1995, you served as Interim President of the University of Massachusetts system. Your retirement in December 2012 thus marks a formal milestone in an illustrious career… It is UMass Boston’s privilege at this time to recognize and honor you with the title of Professor Emerita for your invaluable contributions to making our campus a compelling force in the sphere of public higher education.

NECN’s CEO Corner Featured the Emerging Leaders Program

Sun, Feb 10, 2013 - 1:55 pm

Check out the interview on-line!

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Rick Jakious and Lisa DeAngelis Prepping

Lisa DeAngelis, Director of the Center for Collaborative Leadership and the Emerging Leaders Program (ELP) was interviewed by Peter Howe of NECN for his weekly segment, CEO Corner. The CEO Corner features interviews and discussion with New England’s key business leaders. Joining DeAngelis were ELP alums Craig Williams ‘07 and Rick Jakious ‘09. Williams is the Chief Operating Officer at Tufts Medical Center and Jakious is the Chief Executive Officer of the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network. The interview focused on the lessons learned in the ELP, and how those lessons carry over into their roles as C-level leaders. Aired Sunday, February 10, 2013 at 8:30 PM. 

Lisa DeAngelis Invited to West Point

Fri, Feb 8, 2013 - 1:28 pm

February 2013

Center for Collaborative Leadership Director, Lisa DeAngelis, was invited to West Point as part the Authentic Leadership Institute (ALI).  Led by Nick Craig, President of ALI, DeAngelis was among a select group of facilitators chosen to work with a group of faculty and staff at West Point from February 8 – 10, 2013. The purpose of the visit was to clarify the West Point faculty and staff’s strengths, articulate their motivators, and discover their purpose.

DeAngelis states, “Those at West Point clearly understand leadership in a way that many of us never will.  Their decisions truly do have life or death implications.  And yet, this group was quickly able to drill down to the essence of who they are and their unique leadership gifts.  By the end of the weekend they were already thinking about ways to integrate this into their current role at West Point.”

The Authentic Leadership Institute works with a wide variety of organizations to deliver extraordinary programs to shift the effectiveness of leaders and build the foundations of effective organizations. ALI programs help individuals increase their self-awareness and learn how to leverage their unique gifts as leaders.

 

What we learned from Michael Brown and Earl Martin Phalen

Thu, Jan 17, 2013 - 10:08 am

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Lisa DeAngelis and Earl Martin Phalen

What do City Year CEO Michael Brown and Reach Out and Read CEO Earl Martin Phalen have in common? Apparently, they both would have made excellent lawyers. During the 2013 ELP Forum at City Year on January 17, fellows heard from Michael Brown and Earl Martin Phalen. During the course of hearing their stories, we learned that both attended Harvard Law School, and both had plans on pursuing law as a career.  It seems they led parallel lives as each also had a pivotal moment during the course of their education that influenced them to walk away from such a lucrative career.

For Brown, it was interning for then Representative Leon Panetta. Representative Panetta exposed Brown to an idea that would change his life: National Service. For Phalen, it was volunteering at an orphanage in Haiti as a school teacher. Those crucible moments allowed for each to take a risk and follow their passion. For Brown, it was co-founding City Year with his college roommate Alan Khazei, and for Phalen, it was starting BELL (Building Educated Leaders for Life). Each is an extremely successful nonprofit organization that really does change the lives of young people.

The Center for Collaborative Leadership thanks each of these individuals for stepping out of their comfort zones, and finding the courage to choose a path that is not often chosen.  And we thank you both for sharing your stories with the fellows of the Emerging Leaders Program 2013 cohort. 

Our Founder

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The Founding Director is Sherry H. Penney, the first holder of the Sherry H. Penney Endowed Professorship in Leadership in the College of Management at the University of Massachusetts Boston.  Dr. Penney previously served as the Chancellor of UMass Boston, 1988-2000.  She also served as interim president of the University of Massachusetts system in 1995 and interim president of SUNY Plattsburgh 1986-1987.  She brings her experience of over thirteen years as a CEO to her position in an endowed professorship of leadership.

Previously she was the Vice Chancellor for Academic Programs, Policy and Planning for the SUNY system, and prior to that appointment she was Associate Provost at Yale University.  She has taught at Yale University, SUNY Albany, Union College in Schenectady, and UMass Boston.

Currently, she serves on the Boards of South Shore Hospital and the International Leadership Association.

She is the author of Patrician in Politics: Daniel Dewey Barnard of New York (1974), which deals with New York politics in the 19th Century.  She also is co-author with James D. Livingston of a biography of the l9th century feminist and abolitionist Martha Coffin Wright entitled A Very Dangerous Woman: Martha Wright and Women’s Rights (2004).  With her colleague Patricia Neilson, she compiled Voices of the Future: Emerging Leaders (2009), which features essays by emerging leaders. Penney and Neilson’s book Next Generation Leadership: Emerging Leaders (2010) deals with Gen Y and Gen Y and their views on leadership. She also has published several articles in professional journals.  The most recent is “Voices of the Future: Leadership for the 21st Century,” Journal of Leadership Studies, 2011.

She has received honorary degrees from Albion College in Michigan and from Quincy College in Massachusetts.  Other recognition includes the Pinnacle Award for lifetime achievement from the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce, the New England Women’s Leadership Award, the Distinguished Citizen Award for Racial Harmony from Black/White Boston, the College Club Award, the Abigail Adams Award from the Massachusetts Women’s Political Caucus, Leader in Diversity award from the Boston Business Journal and a Lifetime Leadership award from the Center for Collaborative Leadership. She is a frequent speaker on higher education, governance issues, and leadership. 

Farewell to Dr. Sherry Penney

Wed, Dec 12, 2012 - 12:08 pm

Stephen Roger’s speech at the ELP Holiday Party on 12/12/12:

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Class Reps Johanna Storella ‘08 and Kelly Cameron ‘09 at the holiday party. More pictures

When I first leaned down to shake Sherry’s hand in January of 2008, I had no idea how much I would come to look UP to her in the coming years. I was driving by UMass the other day, looking at all of the new building activity. Thinking of UMass always reminds me of ELP, which leads me to thinking of Sherry Penney. The buildings at UMass were being created to address a gap in the school’s infrastructure, to ensure the school continues to thrive into the future. Sherry identified a similar gap in the interpersonal infrastructure of greater Boston, a need for more cross-sector leadership, which caused her to found the Center for Collaborative Leadership and the Emerging Leaders Program.

It’s clear when you’re done building a building…the finishing touches are complete, the building inspector comes in and declares it structurally sound and safe. You’ve made your vision a reality. But when your vision isn’t as concrete as a physical structure, how do you know when it’s complete? How do you know when its safe to move on?

When ELP started, threads began to connect each of us, across the city, state, backgrounds and sectors. Since then, the threads have woven into a strong web that blankets the state, connecting each of us, helping us make differences we never could have otherwise…these threads that connect those in this room, and many more, they all lead back to you Sherry.  And so as you look out to this room, at the people you’ve helped grow and their connection to each other, its clear that you’ve ensured that the Center for Collaborative Leadership and the Emerging Leaders Program will continue to grow and thrive, it’s clear that you’ve achieved your vision. And so, I’d like to welcome all of us here whose threads lead back to Sherry to say thanks with a round of applause.

Stephen Roger is an alum from the 2008 program and currently serves on the ELP Alumni Board as Vice Chair

Civic Engagement Team Project

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2005 Fellows

In teams of 6 to 8 members, fellows work on projects of value to the Greater Boston region.  Each team works collaboratively with a client, usually a nonprofit or governmental organization.  The projects are based on client needs that address Greater Boston issues and provide an unprecedented laboratory for practicing skills in collaboration and teamwork. By working on team projects, fellows are exposed to how things work in the region and who the stakeholders are.  In addition, the projects provide an opportunity to add value to the community. Results of the project are presented in the fall to the Mayor and other business and community stakeholders. 

The current 2014 cohort teams are working with sponsor organizations such as the Massachusetts Business Roundtable (MBR); Hospitality Homes; and 3 UMass Boston Centers: Commonwealth Compact; Center for Social Policy and Center for Collaborative Leadership.

Some of the past projects include “Retaining Young Professionals in Massachusetts” (2007) (report pdf), and “The Role of Young Professionals in Philanthropy” (2008) (executive summary pdf). For the 2009 project, fellows assisted a new non-profit organization, Boston World Partnerships, with planning and development (report pdf). The 2010 fellows worked with the Center for Social Policy in UMass Boston’s McCormack Graduate School. Their project centered around reshaping economic revitalization policy for the 21st century. The 2011 Fellows continued honing in on the work that the 2010 fellows started, and worked on “Making a Difference on Pressing Economic and Social Issues.” The 2012 fellows worked with various organizations including the Mass Business Roundtable, Boston Health Care for the Homeless, Boston Tenant Coalition, and the Trotter Institute. Two projects addressed improving health outcomes for everyone, drawing lessons from corporate wellness plans as well as expanding awareness of care options for homeless people with complex health challenges. Three projects addressed the importance of healthy places to live, including affordable housing, economic districts enlivened by the arts, and economic development that collaboratively engages multiple non-profit organizations as well as residents. And one team worked with the Center for Collaborative Leadership to support our own ability to advance the wisdom of collaborative leadership, the vision of a thriving region, and the continuous engagement of a new generation of leaders.

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Jeff Swartz: Message of Collaboration and Social Change

Thu, Nov 8, 2012 - 3:44 pm

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Jeff Swartz, Keynote Speaker. More pictures >>
Jeff Swartz, former CEO of Timberland, offered a compelling keynote address at the 2012 Changing the Face of Leadership lunch on November 7, 2012 at the Park Plaza Hotel. Over two hundred guests were on hand to celebrate the 2012 Emerging Leaders Program fellows as they walked across the stage as graduates of the program, and to hear what Jeff Swartz had to say.

Jeff’s message conveyed that the class of 2012 coupled with the collective power of over 400 alums of the Emerging Leaders Program can make a difference. As leaders, we all need to think about real collaboration for real solutions to problems. When Timberland started their collaboration with City Year, he stated, “It wasn’t about giving them red jackets for a photo op. It was about investing in a social justice organization by helping them learn how to run a business that is sustainable.” He noted that every corporation today needs to have a strategy for profit and a strategy for social justice. It requires hard work, conviction, accountability, and collaboration. Jeff challenged the emerging leaders to create an agenda for social change that is integral to the business strategy. He concluded by stating “I look towards you hopefully. It is in your hands to make a difference, and the world awaits you.”

Emerging Leaders October Forum at BNY Mellon

Thu, Oct 18, 2012 - 12:49 pm

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Travis McCready speaking with ELP Fellows after his talk

On October 18, 2012 fellows attended the Emerging Leaders Program forum on Navigating Change and Strategic Planning sponsored by Bank of New York Mellon. Our morning Path to Leadership speaker was Vicary Graham, President of BNY Mellon Wealth Management’s New England region. We were fortunate to have alums of the Program from BNY Mellon join us for her talk: Carl Guerin ‘11, Patrick Hughes ‘12, and Samanda Morales ‘07, along with current fellow Katie Simmarano. Graham provided an account of how she was able to rise through the ranks at BNY Mellon. Hughes, a Senior Supervisor for the organization said, “Listening to Vicary speak was both enlightening and motivating. As she spoke about the series of mergers the company has gone through during her time of service, I realized the immense faith she has in the organization’s ability to integrate several business functions, eliminate redundancies, and effectively move forward as one business unit seeking to maximize stakeholder value.” Graham also reflected on what she would have done differently as she gave her advice to the emerging leaders in the room, “Don’t wait to build your network. I waited too long. You need to develop key relationships, and create a peer network. It’s so important. A good peer network can help you to think strategically about your next steps.”  She went on to talk about the importance of building your brand, assessing yourself formally with a 360 or MBTI, and taking the time to think strategically.

The fellows also heard from the Executive Director of the Kendall Square Association, Travis McCready. McCready spoke of his “quick six” lessons for emerging leaders. Much of what he spoke about echoed Graham’s advice including the value of having a trusted peer network. Both also spoke about the importance of being financially literate. In business, as a leader, it doesn’t matter if you are not a numbers person or do not have responsibility for the budget, you need to know how to interpret and analyze numbers. McCready added that it’s also very important to know that you are worth a certain amount, and to never sell yourself short. Another parallel in each of their talks was about branding yourself. McCready stated, “Everything you do is an opportunity to market yourself as a leader.” He advised fellows to think of themselves as Griots: master story tellers that are able to take words and convert them to images of success.  The fourth of the “quick six” was to “do process when process is due” meaning don’t ignore the red tape. Not following a process where there is a process can lead to disaster, so his advice was to jump through the hoops to save yourself in the long run. Number five: to teach is the learn twice. Simply stated, you can learn a lot by helping others, and sometimes “it helps you to expose flaws in your logic.” Finally, he advised fellows to not be afraid of the risks involved with leadership. As a leader, there is always a proverbial sword hanging over your head. And, as a leader, if the sword falls, don’t take it personally, learn from it, and move on.

The day was book-ended with two very intense skill sessions. Professor Marc Lavine of UMass Boston’s College of Management facilitated a session on Navigating Change. He advised the fellows to shift from problem solving to what he terms “positive deviance”: the ability to think about what is possible, and strive for an outcome that is exceptional. Greg Collins, Operating Partner at Blue Wolf Capital Partners, facilitated the Change and Strategy session. One fellow stated, “I could listen and learn so much from [Greg] and did! Dynamite presentation that had the teams on track moving in a direction towards accomplishing greatness.”

ELP Selects Team Project Sponsors for 2013 Fellows

Thu, Aug 9, 2012 - 11:58 am

Each year, the Fellows in the UMass Boston Center for Collaborative Leadership’s Emerging Leaders Program discover and practice collaborative leadership skills by working together in peer-led teams on projects that involve multiple stakeholders and have broad civic impacts. The projects for 2013 contribute to the economic and social well-being of the Boston area by harnessing the power of an engaged community. 

The six project sponsors selected for this year are: Children’s Trust Fund (CTF); Girl Scouts of Eastern Massachusetts; Massachusetts Business Roundtable (MBR); Science from Scientists; and UMass Boston’s Center for Social Policy and Center for Collaborative Leadership. On September 12th the Fellows will learn about each of the sponsor organizations and their projects.

The Emerging Leaders Program Fellows that select the CTF will help them establish a Young Professionals group that will act as an advocate on behalf of CTF in the community. The team that selects the Girl Scouts of Eastern Massachusetts will assist in a major website restructure and redesign enabling them to engage their different audiences (girls, adult volunteers, staff, and donors). The Massachusetts Business Roundtable will work with an ELP Team to review symbiotic relationships that are emerging between small businesses and large companies in order to highlight these relationships and their impact on our economy in Massachusetts. Science from Scientists will work with a team of Fellows to design and develop a communications toolkit to support their strategic goals.  The UMass Boston Center for Social Policy (CSP), with its Fourth World Movement (FWM) partner, will engage the ELP team in a pilot program of dialogues for their ‘merging knowledge’ project. Finally, the Center for Collaborative Leadership will work with a team to explore how we measure the impact of the project team work for both the participants and the sponsor organizations.

The Center’s Director, Lisa DeAngelis, worked to solicit impactful projects with a number of Boston area organizations. She states, “The reality for many of these organizations is that they are under-staffed and over-worked. A team of highly qualified Fellows from our program provides the additional expertise that enables these non-profits to make substantial progress on strategic initiatives.” 

On October 3, the Fellows from the 2012 Emerging Leaders Program will present their project outcomes at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. The 2012 group worked with the Mass Business Roundtable, Boston Health Care for the Homeless, Boston Tenant Coalition, and UMass Boston’s Trotter Institute, Center for Social Policy, and the Center for Collaborative Leadership. To find out more about this event, please visit http://www.leaders.umb.edu/index.php/event/2012_emerging_leaders_program_team_project_presentation/

ELP July Forum at EMC

Fri, Jul 20, 2012 - 1:49 pm

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Gail Deegan speaking to the 2012 Fellows

On Thursday, July 19, 2012, Emerging Leaders Program Fellows met at EMC Corporation for their last official forum. In the morning, the cohort heard from Path to Leadership speaker Gail Deegan. As a member of the EMC Corporation Board of Advisers, Deegan serves as Chair of Audit Committee and Member of Governance and Nominating Committee. She offered plenty of leadership advice including, “get good information, and take a stand, however, be willing to change if you know your stand is wrong because no matter what, you need to keep moving forward.”

In addition to hearing from Deegan, the Fellows presented on their team projects. The first team discussed distilling the best practices in corporate wellness initiatives. A write-up on that project with the MBR can be found in the UMass Boston News. The second team worked with Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program to evaluate their social media outreach and engagement. The third team proposed a marketing and communications plan to their sponsoring organization, the Boston Tenant Coalition. Team four’s work supported the Upham’s Corner Collaborative in exploring arts and economic development strategies for that area. The fifth team engaged with the UMass Boston Center for Social Policy. They are working on a video to highlight the CSP which will premiere at their 20th Anniversary Gala on October 17. Finally, team seven worked with the Center for Collaborative Leadership to enhance alumni engagement. Their work will help the Center create an on-line centralized platform for a one-stop-shop for communication and distance learning.

We look forward to hearing the consolidated team project to community and business stakeholders on October 3 at the Federal Reserve.

About the Emerging Leaders Program

The Program selects a diverse group of high potential individuals from the corporate, non-profit and public sectors to participate in a 9-month long leadership development program consisting of 90 hours of “in class” sessions. A cornerstone of this program is broadening the participants’ awareness of issues facing the region and challenging them to offer solutions. Survey data shows the alumni are more civically engaged as a result of the program. Liveda Clements, 2003 Senior Fellow from Blue Cross Blue Shield, writes:

The program provides Boston with a diverse group of dynamic leaders who are prepared to collaborate in order to develop creative solutions for some of Boston’s most pressing issues, for this, the program should be recognized as one of Boston’s most valuable assets.

Please click here for more information about the Emerging Leaders Program.

Emerging Leaders at UMass Boston Work to Make Bay State More Business-Friendly

Fri, Jul 13, 2012 - 1:50 pm

By Colleen Locke, UMass Boston Office of Communications | July 11, 2012

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2012 Fellows

Fellows enrolled in the Emerging Leaders Program (ELP), based out of the Center for Collaborative Leadership at the University of Massachusetts Boston, are preparing their findings on projects that work to improve the health of the work force, living areas, and economic districts in Greater Boston.

Fellows in UMass Boston’s nine-month executive training program have been working since January with the center, the Massachusetts Business Roundtable (MBR), Boston Health Care for the Homeless, the Boston Tenant Coalition, and UMass Boston’s William Monroe Trotter Institute for the Study of Black History and Culture. They join a list of more than 400 professionals from over 150 nonprofit, government, and private-sector organizations who have participated in team projects since the program was founded 10 years ago.

“We have found that team projects that engage current civic and economic challenges are a powerful way for the fellows to enhance their leadership skills,” said Lisa DeAngelis, director of the Center for Collaborative Leadership.

Fellows Mark Auriemma and Kelly Dougherty are part of the team working with the Massachusetts Business Roundtable, which is committed to making the state more business-friendly.

Auriemma works at State Street, managing client relationships with institutional money managers for the Stable Value Group. Dougherty is the executive director of the CardioVascular Center at Tufts Medical Center. They are a part of a six-member group that has been working on identifying best practices in corporate wellness programs that could potentially change the perception of Massachusetts as an expensive place to do business.

“I am focusing on presenting the case for pursuing wellness programming – why, particularly in Massachusetts, this may represent a good value proposition for employers,” Dougherty said.

JD Chesloff, executive director of the Massachusetts Business Roundtable, said the organization’s ongoing relationship with UMass Boston and the Emerging Leaders Program has been invaluable.

The partnership “offers a high-quality, reliable resource for research that we do not have the internal capacity to conduct. It is also a pleasure working with the emerging leaders and the ELP staff to promote a program which we believe is important to the community,” Chesloff said.

The fellows say their involvement has produced professional and personal benefits.

“One of the best parts of the Emerging Leaders Program is that it has encouraged me to think beyond my own industry and career, and to think more broadly about the issues affecting my community and how I can become more involved,” Dougherty said.

Fellows working on five separate projects presented their findings to each other on July 19. They will present results to sponsors in September, with a final presentation for stakeholders scheduled for October 3 at the Federal Reserve Bank in Boston.

Exhale Magazine Features Emerging Leaders Program

Wed, Jul 11, 2012 - 12:37 pm

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Patti Quint of Citibank

In the Summer 2012 Issue of Exhale Magazine, three Boston area leadership development programs are highlighted, including the UMass Boston Emerging Leaders Program. Patti Quint, senior vice president at Citibank and alumna of the 2007 program is featured in the article:

On a personal level, Quint said the program boosted her self-confidence and inspired her to pursue the pivotal next step in her career. “I think I had been in the shadow of other people, and maybe relied on other people a little more and hadn’t necessarily taken that lead role,” she said. “I think my biggest accomplishment was building that belief in myself and my skills.” Check out Top Leadership Programs for Boston’s Rising Women by Lauren Carter.

Also featured in the Summer issue is Marlo Fogelman of marlo marketing / communications. Check out The Marlo Method: Winning Over One Client at a Time by Abby Kurzman.

Emerging Leaders Program June 2012 Forum

Tue, Jun 26, 2012 - 1:33 pm

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Path to Leadership Speaker David Howse

The June Emerging Leaders Program Forum focused on authentic leadership. Much of the day was spent working with John Haskell of the Authentic Leadership Institute (ALI). The ALI “helps leaders find their true north.” Evaluations from the session were very positive, including comments such as: This workshop helped me to think about my own leadership development and how I see myself developing and growing; This was a very useful session. It helped us connect with our classmates in ways that we hadn’t before; I really enjoyed the small group exercise. We were able to build a relationship as we shared our experiences.

The Fellows also heard from Path to Leadership speaker David Howse, Executive Director of the Boston Children’s Chorus. Howse spoke about how he learned about leadership through music. It started in fourth grade when his teacher appointed him as the lead character in the school play. Today he realizes that this opportunity and others like it helped him reach his full potential as a leader.

ELP Ladies Golf Clinic

Mon, Jun 4, 2012 - 9:16 am

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The putting lesson. More pictures >>

Golf is a great networking opportunity that many ELP alumna noted missing out on. To help our ELP alumna learn the game of golf, the Center for Collaborative Leadership hosted a Ladies Golf Clinic for Beginners on May 30. President’s Golf Course in Quincy provided the ideal location for the clinic, as well as the instruction. Assistant golf pros Jim McMahon and Rob Churchill taught the attendees putting, chipping and the rules of the game. Sixteen alums learned how to line up their putts, practice putting speed, and learned the delicate art of the chip. After, they enjoyed some drinks, appetizers, and catching up with each other in the on-site restaurant, The View. Stay tuned for more information about the Golf Clinic, Part II.

Emerging Leaders Program May Forum

Thu, May 17, 2012 - 10:38 am

ELP fellows from BCBS with speaker
ELP fellows and alums from BCBSMA with Path to Leadership Speaker Dr. Dana Safran. See more pictures >>

The Emerging Leaders Program May 17, 2012 forum was hosted by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts. Fellows heard from three impressive Path to Leadership speakers: Bob Sheridan, CEO of SBLI, Kevin Harron, Founder and CEO of Burtons Grill, and Dr. Dana Gelb Safran, Senior Vice President for Performance Measurement and Improvement for the Health Care Services Division of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts. In addition, fellows learned the importance of their brand from our Founding Director, Dr. Sherry Penney. In addition, Benyamin B. Lichtenstein, Associate Professor of Entrepreneurship & Management at UMass Boston facilitated Leadership as “Entrepreneuring”: Dynamics for Creating, Growing and Sustaining Organizations and Important Projects. ELP fellows in the 2012 cohort have 2 sessions remaining in the program.

At this time, as the Center prepares the remaining forums for 2012, we are also gearing up for the first ever September Emerging Leaders Program.

 

Employer Benefits

Employer Challenge


Retention of highly educated and talented workers who serve as the resource foundation for the knowledge-based businesses that will drive the future economy of the Greater Boston region

What does ELP provide?

  • Provides high-potential emerging leaders with an intimate understanding of the challenges faced by their organizations and the larger community
  • Engages emerging leaders within a collaborative team-based setting to tackle components of these challenges
  • Promotes emerging leaders to develop a broader contextualized awareness of the roles and responsibilities accessible to emerging leaders within their organizations and community

Benefit to Employer

  • Motivated, energized employees who are better able to take-on complex challenges that leads to talent retention

Employer Challenge


Provision of appropriate and effective incentives that recognize and motivate high-performers/producers within a resource-constrained environment

What does ELP provide?

  • Brands participants as “emerging leaders” within their organization and the broader community
  • Provides a safe environment for risk-taking and lesson-learning that can be translated back to the work environment

Benefit to Employer

  • Employees with strengthened roots and firmer levels of commitment to their organizations and community

Employer Challenge


Ability to identify and address emerging issues and trends

What does ELP provide?

  • Establishes for emerging leaders an immediate wide-spread active network of like-minded peers across industries and sectors
  • Provides opportunities for learning and discussing executive-level concerns directly with business and civic leaders

Benefit to Employer

  • Employees with a nuanced understanding of the issues and concerns that weigh on the minds of executives and business leaders, that can activate their networks to tap into the perspectives and experiences of other rising leaders

 

 

ELP April 2012 Forum

Fri, Feb 3, 2012 - 9:58 am

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ELP Fellows Joe Duffy and Patrick Hughes with Path to Leadership Speaker Nadine Chakar. Visit our FB page for more pictures from the April forum

The 2012 Emerging Leaders Program April 19 forum was hosted by BNY Mellon in Everett. Fellows heard from Nadine Chakar, Global Head of Derivatives 360 at BNY Mellon and Dr. Paula Johnson, Head of the Mary Horrigan Connors Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology and Chief of the Division of Women’s Health at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. In addition, fellows learned about Effective Delegation from Mark Michaud, Senior Director of Technology Business Development at the MCCA and Lisa DeAngelis, Director of the Center. In addition, they worked on a case study about change management facilitated by Professor Marc Lavine of UMass Boston’s College of Management. ELP fellows in the 2012 cohort have 4 sessions remaining in the program.

 

Boston Children’s Chorus Leader Elected to South Shore Hospital Board of Directors

Thu, Feb 2, 2012 - 3:46 pm


South Shore Hospital Press Release

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David Howse, ELP 2005 (photo courtesy of South Shore Hospital)

South Weymouth, Mass., February 2, 2012 – Randolph resident David C. Howse has been elected to the board of directors of South Shore Hospital and its parent, South Shore Health and Educational Corporation.

Mr. Howse is Executive Director of the Boston Children’s Chorus, overseeing development, strategy and operations for the organization. He has been with Boston Children’s Chorus since 2004, assuming the position of Executive Director in 2009.

David C. Howse holds degrees from Bradley University and New England Conservatory of Music and is a graduate of Harvard Business School’s Next Generation Executive Leadership Program, University of Massachusetts at Boston’s Emerging Leaders Program and Boston University’s Institute for Nonprofit Management and Leadership.

Mr. Howse is the recipient of Root Cause’s Social Innovation Achievement Award and in 2010, he was honored with a Boston Business Journal “40 Under 40” Award, recognizing him as one of Boston’s best and brightest young executives. He lives in Randolph with his wife and their two sons.

South Shore Hospital is a subsidiary of South Shore Health and Educational Corporation. Both are charitable and not-for-profit organizations governed by a volunteer board of directors. The hospital is the leading provider of acute, emergency, outpatient, home health, and hospice care in Southeastern Massachusetts, employing 3,800 full- and part-time employees and with a medical staff of approximately 900 physicians.

ELP Alums Featured on Urban Update

Wed, Jan 25, 2012 - 1:35 pm

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Johanna Storella during Urban Update Interview

The UMass Boston Center for Collaborative Leadership’s Emerging Leaders Program was featured on WHDH-TV’s Urban Update in mid-December. The segment included interviews with ELP alums Craig Williams of Tufts Medical Center (2007) and Johanna Storella of the Massachusetts Convention Center Authority (2008). Also interviewed were UMass Boston Chancellor, J. Keith Motley, and the Center’s Director, Lisa DeAngelis. Host Byron Barnett spoke with the group about the impact the Emerging Leaders Program has had on each individual and also the impact the team projects have had on the city of Boston. Both Craig and Johanna talked at great length about the professional and personal connections they each made through the program and how the ELP has opened doors as they progress through their careers.

The video can be accessed via our You Tube page under “favorites”. Please note the video is segmented with breaks from 5:40 - 6:00 and from 11:30 - 15:00. The ELP segment concludes at 22:30.

UMass Boston Emerging Leaders Program Welcomes 2012 Cohort January 23

Tue, Jan 17, 2012 - 5:34 pm

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John Herlihy, BNY Mellon presenting to Fellows

Boston, MA - The selection committee of the Emerging Leaders Program of the College of Management at UMass Boston has accepted 31 Fellows to participate in the 2012 cohort of the Emerging Leaders Program. For the past ten years, UMass Boston’s Emerging Leaders Program has established an executive leadership development offering that engages individuals across sector, gender, race and ethnicity in an experiential collaborative, skill-building program. The program focuses on several critical skills, including communication and negotiation strategies, risk taking and entrepreneurship, the impact of new media/social media on your brand and your company, ethical practices, change management, team building, and networking.

The Program kicks off on January 23 at the UMass Boston campus with a week-long series of forums. Fellows will hear from Boston’s top leaders including: J. Keith Motley, Chancellor of UMass Boston; Joan Wallace-Benjamin, President of the Home for Little Wanderers; Gloria Larson, President of Bentley University; John Connors, Founder and President of the Boathouse Group, and Small Can Be Big; Travis McCready, Executive Director of the Kendall Square Association; José Massó, Host/Producer of ¡Con Salsa!, WBUR; and Robert Matthews, Vice Chairman, Commercial Banking, Citizens Financial Group, Inc.

“The 2012 cohort will join the 426 emerging leader alums—a group of emerging leaders that enhances the available talent pool and answers the concern that we need more skilled leaders” said Sherry Penney, Found Director of the Emerging Leadership Program. “As they network with each other and with current leaders and hone skills in teamwork, they will start to assume leadership roles of increasing responsibility in this community.”

Click here to view list of Fellows

ELP Alum Named CEO of Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

Wed, Jan 11, 2012 - 10:18 am

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Rick Jakious

Rick Jakious, Emerging Leaders Program alum from the 2009 cohort, has been named CEO of the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network. Rick was accepted into the Emerging Leaders Program (ELP) while he served as Deputy Director of External Affairs for City Year. Shortly after his year as an ELP Felllow, he was promoted to National Team Sponsor Director.

ELP Fellows work on a team project as part of the curriculum. For the 2009 cohort, our program partnered with Boston World Partnerships, which at the time was launching as a new nonprofit focused on generating high quality leads for economic growth in the city of Boston. The team Rick chose to be on evaluated BWP’s organizational effectiveness, considering questions such as: How does a small start-up operate?  What is the role of the Advisory Board?  How does BWP staff manage the workload and draw in a virtual community that co-creates it? The team came up with recommendations to tier membership in order to get the right people into the right areas, allow for volunteer life-cycle, review connectors, reward and recognize connectors, allow for a transparent management structure, and to democratize decision-making.

Teammate Devin Cole comments, “Working with Rick on Boston World Partnerships’ organizational effectiveness was a great opportunity for me to think through a complex problem. Rick was a real leader on our team, which was exceptionally close. Now that I’m on staff at BWP, I think every day about the concepts that we thought through and presented. Especially important are the notions of Connector review, rewarding and recognizing Connectors for their service, and democratized decision-making. As we move forward with BWP, active and accomplished Connectors will continue to be a driving force in the organization’s growth plan.”

Through the team projects, Path to Leadership speakers, and skill sessions, the Emerging Leaders Program empowers leaders for tomorrow—skillful and accomplished leaders from all sectors of our community who will be moving into major leadership positions in their organizations. Rick is the most recent example of an alum who has taken his leadership to the next level. We are proud of his accomplishments, and look forward to following his career with the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network.

See coverage in Boston.com and Boston Business Journal

Changing the Face of Leadership

Tue, Oct 11, 2011 - 9:03 am

A night of remembrance, reflection and looking ahead – Tenth Anniversary Gala at the JFK Library

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Honorees: George Russell, Sherry Penney, Marsh Carter. See more pictures >>

On Saturday, November 5 the UMass Boston Emerging Leaders Program hosted a Tenth Anniversary Gala: Changing the Face of Leadership, honoring Marshall Carter, Chair of the NYSE, George Russell, EVP of State Street Corporate Citizenship and founding director, Sherry Penney. Carter and Russell provided the grant from State Street Corporation to launch the program.

Margaret McKenna, Former President of the Walmart Foundation, our Keynote speaker, spoke of the importance of government, nonprofit, and profit coming together to effectively address issues facing the world today.  Chancellor Keith Motley shared his dedication to the ELP mission of developing the next generation of leaders.
 
More than 350 guests also celebrated the founding members of the ELP Advisory Board, and the 2011 Emerging Leaders Fellows. The event was emceed by Dan Rea of WBZ Nightside with Dan Rea.

The purpose of night can be best summed up by Dr. Penney’s remarks: “In ELP we have learned to talk with each other, listen to each other and work with those with whom we may disagree. We have learned about creativity, collaboration and community—skills that will help meet the challenges ahead. You, the ELP alumni, are ready to meet these challenges and ones we cannot even contemplate tonight, so I look ahead with optimism to the future of the human race. Thank you again to our founders and our sustaining partners over the years and all who made the ELP possible.”

See pictures!
Watch the Gala video!


Thank you to our Sponsors:
State Street Corporation Visionary Leadership Sponsor

AT&T Partner Sponsor
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Partner Sponsor
Eastern Bank Partner Sponsor
NSTAR Electric & Gas Partner Sponsor
Partners Community HealthCare, Inc. Partner Sponsor
Sovereign | Santanter Partner Sponsor
Wells Fargo Partner Sponsor

Citizens Bank Friend Sponsor
Mabbett & Associates, Inc. Friend Sponsor & Civic Star
Massachusetts Convention Center Authority Friend Sponsor
Savings Bank Life Insurance (SBLI) Friend Sponsor
The Boston Globe Friend Sponsor
The Trefler Foundation Friend Sponsor
University of Massachusetts Boston, Office of the Chancellor Friend Sponsor
Dave DeFilippo, Lisa Shapiro, John & Ann Herlihy Friend Sponsor

Citibank Supporter
Massachusetts AFL-CIO Supporter
UMass Boston McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies Supporter
Sherry Penney & Jim Livingston Supporter

Spotlight Communications Table
TD Bank North Table

UMass Boston Center for Social Policy Affiliate

Marketing & Public Relations for this event provided by McDermott Ventures

Making a Difference on Pressing Economic and Social Issues

Wed, Oct 5, 2011 - 11:12 am

Learning about and living the collaborative leadership model

Read Boston.com article

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Howard Leibowitz, City of Boston
More pictures >>

Creating a stable and healthy economy is vital for the people who live in the Boston region, the organizations that employ them, and the investors who look to our region for innovation. Current social and economic challenges include ensuring affordable and equitably accessible housing for the people who do the essential work of the local economy, supporting low wage workers so that their work sustains both their families and their organizations in a steady and ongoing way, and providing healthy activity for children to curb the obesity epidemic.

Seven teams from the 2011 cohort of Emerging Leaders engaged these issues, starting with a collaborative process of learning about the issues from community stakeholders and non-profit leaders, and then crafting projects that made a difference in important and concrete ways.

On October 4, 2011, ELP Fellows: Andrew Russell, Museum of Fine Arts; Tim Sullivan, Massachusetts AFL-CIO; Tom Yeulenski, Tufts Health Plan; Raul Porras, EMC; Jennifer Thibadeau, Raytheon; Michael McCarthy, The Boston Globe and Carl Guerin, The Boston Company Asset Management presented the findings of their respective ELP teams to a number of community and business stakeholders.

After the presentation, Howard Leibowitz, Chief of Projects and Partnerships for the City of Boston spent a few minutes addressing the team’s findings. Overall, he was impressed with their efforts and urged them to “keep doing what you’re doing.”

A panel of stakeholders also addressed the findings – they included: Deb Felton of Milton Fuller Housing Corporation, Christine Green of the Trefler Foundation and Fred Ramos of State Street Corporation. The panel was moderated by ELP Team Project Facilitator, and UMass Boston Associate Professor in the College of Management, Maureen Scully. Felton’s remarks focused the strength of having emerging leaders engaged in making a difference in their communities.  She also talked to the inter-generational dialogues that have been enabled by this work – bringing all voices to the table to understand and address issues. Green stressed the catalytic impact of the team projects stating that they create potential for positive change. Ramos noted the reality that many civic projects need funding, and the funding comes from the for-profit world. He stressed that collaborative leaders engaging in a civic project need to demonstrate the impact in order to gain the financial support.

The session concluded with additional dialogue around the impact of the team projects, the importance of cross-collaboration between the sectors and how the UMass Boston Emerging Leaders Program facilitates that process.

For more information about the projects, please download the Executive Summary. The event was sponsored by State Street Corporation. 

Sherry Penney to be honored for Life Time Achievement at the BBJ Leaders in Diversity Awards

Tue, Sep 20, 2011 - 10:15 am

The Boston Business Journal has announced the recipients of its 2011 Leaders in Diversity Awards, the publication’s annual program that honors companies and business people for their leadership in promoting inclusiveness and economic opportunity.

Congratulations to our own Sherry Penney for her honor of the Lifetime Achievement Award.

Sherry, who founded the Emerging Leaders Program at the Center for Collaborative Leadership, has worked tirelessly over the last ten years of the program to identify and develop new leadership in our city which reflect the changing demography of our region. Congratulations Sherry!

The Boston Business Journal will host an event to honor the recipients on October 21 at the Westin Copley Hotel.

Emerging Leaders Program Silent Auction

Emerging Leaders Program at UMass Boston recruiting for executive leadership program

Tue, Sep 6, 2011 - 1:52 pm

Press Release 9/6/11

The Emerging Leaders Program at the Center for Collaborative Leadership, UMass Boston is recruiting fellows for the 2012 and 2103 cohorts.

Celebrating its tenth year, UMass Boston’s Emerging Leaders Program has established an executive leadership development course of study that engages individuals across sector, gender, race and ethnicity in an experiential collaborative, skill-building program.

The 10-month curriculum begins with a week-long seminar in January which features a lecture series with Carol Fulp, SVP of John Hancock; Gloria Larson, President of Bentley University; John Connors, Founder and CEO of Boathouse Group; Travis McCready, Executive Director of Kendall Square Association; José Massó of WBUR; and Robert Matthews, Vice Chairman, Citizens Bank.

This week is followed by monthly day-long sessions featuring dialogue with current leaders in business, government, health care and nonprofit sectors.

The program has four major components: leadership skills sessions with subject-matter experts, dialogue with Greater Boston’s current leaders, leadership style development, and team projects that address social and economic challenges that include ensuring affordable and equitably accessible housing, supporting low wage workers, and providing healthy activity for children to curb the obesity epidemic. 

Applications are being accepted now for both the 2012 and 2013 cohorts. Applicants should have demonstrated leadership ability and have 5-10 years of professional experience. Selection for the 2012 program begins on September 19th.  To apply for the program, go to:  www.leaders.umb.edu/index.php/leaders/application_form.

Emerging Leaders Program and Dr. Sherry Penney Recently Nominated for Awards

Tue, Apr 12, 2011 - 9:45 am

The Center for Collaborative Leadership has recently been nominated for two very important awards: Rosoff Award and the MNN Nonprofit Excellence Award.

The Center’s Emerging Leaders Program was nominated for the Rosoff Award by Eduardo Crespo, Hispanic Marketing Solutions, for our external diversity initiatives.  He writes: “Over the past decade, the Emerging Leaders Program has established a unique leadership development offering that engages individuals across sector, gender, race and ethnicity in an experiential collaborative, skill-building program.  A cornerstone of this program is broadening the participant’s awareness of issues facing the city and challenging them to offer solutions.  One result of which is that the alumni of the program are more civically engaged. Another is that 174 person of color in our region are now ready to take on major leadership roles. The program is now refined to the point that it is able to stand as a model that can be replicated in urban settings across the globe.”

Celebrating its 15th year The Rosoff Awards have come to stand not only for inclusion and meaningful diversity practice, but for smart companies and successful people who are changing the face of Boston. Past winners have represented many industries, from finance to healthcare to education, marketing and advertising. The award ceremony will be held on May 16, 2011.

In addition, Sherry H. Penney has been nominated for a MNN Nonprofit Excellence Award by Tammy Tai of the Hyams Foundation. She writes: “This commitment to creating and reinforcing a model of collaborative leadership continues as a management challenge that Dr. Penney considers with each incoming class of the Emerging Leaders Program.  Dr. Penney works tirelessly to ensure that Boston’s future leaders are exposed to as well as challenged to and supported in developing a variety of leadership styles.  She knows that the Boston of today needs strong diverse leadership and meets this challenge head on with determination and heart.  Dr. Penney embodies the leadership she strives to promote and is very deserving of this award and recognition.”

The MNN Nonprofit Excellence Awards highlight the contributions that nonprofits make across the state. With the public too often unaware of the critical contribution that nonprofits provide for the Commonwealth and the media periodically drawing attention to some negative perceptions about the nonprofit sector, it is important for us to highlight all the good work that nonprofits do for the Commonwealth. These awards shine a spotlight on nonprofit organizations and individuals making a difference in their communities so that the public will be aware of the necessity of these organizations.  The award ceremony will be held on June 13, 2011.

Sherry Penney talks to UMB Women Leaders

Fri, Apr 8, 2011 - 3:12 pm

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Sherry Penney addresses audience. More Pictures

On the afternoon of April 8, Dr. Sherry Penney spoke to a group of women leaders at UMass Boston on her findings in her book, Next Generation Leadership. Part of the talk focused on material found in Chapter 4: Women and Leadership: Progress and Roadblocks. 

She stated, “Although blatant discrimination has decreased, more subtle forms, along with stereotyping, remain in too many instances. One of our colleagues describes the current situation for females as ‘still stuck.’ Yet above all, women stress—don’t’ give up!!  And find ways to support other women.”

Dr. Penney encouraged the audience to form strong networks and make it work for you.  Like the emerging leaders in Next Generation Leadership, we need women leaders in all areas to help make our organizations more collaborative and inclusive and to bring about positive change.

ELP Professional Presence Event

Thu, Apr 7, 2011 - 5:30 pm

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Attendees Listening to Judy Bowman. More pictures

On April 7 the Center for Collaborative Leadership hosted an event for Emerging Leaders Program Alums, Fellows, and guests, “Professional Presence and Business Protocol.” Judith Bowman, President & Founder of Protocol Consultants International, facilitated the evening. Attendees received valuable training to help empower them to present themselves with confidence and authority to fully realize their personal and professional potential.

Equally valuable were the lesson on proper dining skills & etiquette. Attendees were served a challenging three course meal consisting of salad, chicken on the bone, and profiteroles with ice cream and hot fudge sauce.

Our thanks to Judith Bowman for sharing her valuable lessons with our emerging leaders.  ELP Alumni Board Programming Co-Chair Silvia Sarra from Sovereign / Santanter Bank greatly assisted in the planning and development of this event – our gratitude to her for her help. And finally, thank you to to current Fellow, Chris Sinclair, founder of the Anthem Group for securing the venue: Petit Robert Central.

Lisa DeAngelis Named Director of the Center for Collaborative Leadership

Mon, Apr 4, 2011 - 3:45 pm

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Lisa DeAngelis

We are pleased to announce that Lisa DeAngelis has been selected as the new Director for the Center for Collaborative Leadership. For the past four months, Lisa has served as Interim Director while we conducted the search for the permanent Director. We had a strong pool of 55 people apply for the Directorship.

Lisa is an alumnus of the program (2003) with substantial corporate experience and demonstrated her many strengths over the last several months. She has led ELP skill sessions, started to recruit new companies to apply to the Emerging Leaders Program, and developed a fund raising strategy. We look forward to working with her, building on her knowledge of the program and her vision on how to strengthen the ELP and alumni activities in the future.

During this 10th Anniversary Year, we look forward to her leadership as we prepare for the future.

Red Sox Event to Benefit Dorchester Academy a Huge Success

Sun, Apr 3, 2011 - 10:53 am

The 2011 cohort collaborated to organize a charitable event to benefit Dorchester Academy, a UMass Boston neighbor and the school where fellow ELP’er Jill Blouin  teaches. Under the initiative and leadership of Chris Sinclair, founder of Anthem Events, members of the 2011 cohort accepted donations in exchange for VIP packages for the April 16th Red Sox game at Fenway. More than 85 tickets were sold and proceeds were given to the Dorchester Academy for equipment updates and infrastructure renovations.

Plans are underway for a similar fund raiser event in the Summer to benefit the Latino STEM Alliance. LSA is a startup 501c3 initially working to develop afterschool and summer programs targeted at underprivileged youth at the K-16 levels, including parental engagement and cultural-alignment, focused around Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM). LSA was co-founded by Raul Porras (2011) of EMC Corporation.

For more information contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

ELP Managing Your Career Event a Success

Thu, Feb 17, 2011 - 7:00 am

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ELP Panelists. More pictures >>

The Emerging Leaders Program held its second annual “Managing Your Career” event on February 17 at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center. Over 60 ELP fellows, alums, and guests attended.  The event was organized by the ELP Alumni Board Programming Committee. Our moderator and panelists are alums of the ELP and included, Bridget Hindle of Sovereign | Santander Bank (‘08), Tomeeka Farrington of Spotlight Communications (‘06), David Howse of Boston Children’s Chorus (‘05), Mark Michaud of the Massachusetts Convention Center Authority (‘09), Jennifer Panagoulias of Genzyme (‘08), and Nathan Pusey of Citibank (‘03).


Testimonials

I enjoyed the varying perspectives of each panelist, the networking time before the official start, and Bridget Hindle’s 5 minute exercise. The panelists reinforced the importance of networking, collaboration, need for a mentor / personal board of directors. -Carl Guerin, The Boston Asset Management Company, ELP 2011

The entire event was well put together. The event allowed current cohorts as well as potential cohorts to see how the ELP will benefit their careers. -Karl-Henry Francois, Citizen’s Bank

I most valued the panelist’s comments on work/life issues and the ways they build and utilize their professional network. I found it very valuable to get to know the personal stories, challenges, and successes of each of the panelists. I felt a connection with each of them and felt I took away valuable insights from each of them that I can incorporate into my own career/life path. -Patti Quint, Citibank, ELP 2007

It reinforced the importance of networking and that once you get to a particular level in your career, most opportunities present themselves via an actual person and not by submitting a resume. -Nayenday Thurman, Massachusetts Office of Business Development, ELP 2008



ELP Fact Sheet 2002 - 2011

Wed, Dec 22, 2010 - 3:46 pm

The Emerging Leaders Program was founded in 2002. Since then, 426 Fellows have graduated from the program. Did you know that 2011 marked our tenth year anniversary? We are excited to share some data about the program from 2002 - 2011:

  • Overall, between 2002-2011, 157 organizations have sent participants to the program.
  • Sixty-five of the organizations are from the nonprofit sector.
  • Sixteen of the organizations are from the government sector.
  • In our end of the year evaluations, 100% of the participants who responded reported that their overall satisfaction with the Emerging Leaders Program was good to excellent.
  • We have met all of our goals and added an additional goal to “Develop an Alumni Board and alumni activities to foster connections among Senior Fellows and enhance their networks as the ELP continues to grow.”

To read the full report, please click here. 

Emerging Leaders Program 2010 Graduation

Wed, Oct 20, 2010 - 11:51 am

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Chancellor Keith Motley, Sherry Penney, and Randal Pinkett. See more pictures >>

On October 12, 2010, the Emerging Leaders Program graduated its ninth cohort of Fellows. Our keynote speaker, Randal Pinkett, Ph.D., inspired the audience with his talk which focused on working toward greatness. Asking the question, do we want to be successful or great, he encouraged young leaders to move beyond success. Success is about individual accomplishments, greatness is about giving back. He spoke of the great value a Fellow in the Emerging Leaders Program can instill within their communities, providing service where and when needed. A truly remarkable speaker who “practices what he preaches”, Pinkett has established himself as an entrepreneur, speaker, author, scholar and community servant. He is the co-founder, chairman and CEO of BCT Partners, a multimillion dollar management, technology and policy consulting firm based in Newark, NJ. BCT Partners works with corporations, government agencies and nonprofit organizations in the areas of housing and community development, economic development, human services, government, healthcare and education.

Sherry Penney Interview Aired on WUMB

Thu, Oct 7, 2010 - 9:06 am

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Sherry Penney was interviewed by Janice Pryor, WUMB, about her book, “Next Generation Leadership: Insights from Emerging Leaders.” The program, Commonwealth Journal, aired on Sunday, October 10 on 91.9 WUMB. Listen to the podcast. More on Next Generation Leadership.

ELP Fellows Meet with Paul Connolly at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Sun, Sep 26, 2010 - 12:45 pm

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Sherry Penney, Paul Connolly, Pawan Roy. See more pictures >>

On September 23, 2010 the Emerging Leaders Program Fellows and Alumni, along with UMass Boston MBA students had the good fortune to hear from the second in command at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, Mr. Paul Connolly. Connolly is the First Vice President and COO of the bank.  During the session, Connolly presented an entertaining historical overview about what the Fed does, and about what the Federal Reserve has done and learned during the crises of the past couple of years.

Connolly demonstrated that there has been negative employment growth in just about every industry since December 2007 following the “financial shock”.  He described the economy as growing slowly and noted the apparent need for additional actions to enable our economy to grow more strongly and reduce unemployment more quickly.

Another aspect of the presentation was about the leadership role that the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston took on in the midst of the financial crisis in September, 2008.  Pawan Roy (ELP 2010) of Raytheon Corporation attended the presentation, and he reports Connolly gave “outstanding examples of why/when/how great leaders take great risks and provided a sobering reality of current economic conditions.”

Susan Soergel (ELP 2007) of NSTAR agrees: “showing the data from this recent recession versus the past three, and seeing how many sectors of the economy got hit was very informative; fantastic presentation.”

More inclusive business leaders emerging in Boston

Mon, Sep 20, 2010 - 8:52 am

Sherry Penney interview with Patriot Ledger Reporter Jon Chesto

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Sherry Penney and Patricia Neilson, co-authors of Next Generation Leadership

Center for Collaborative Leadership’s founding director, Sherry Penney, was interviewed by the Patriot Ledger’s business editor, Jon Chesto regarding the recently released book “Next Generation Leadership.” Chesto writes, “A new era of corporate leadership is dawning on the Boston area, and Sherry Penney is determined to ensure that the transition goes smoothly.” Penney started the UMass Boston Emerging Leaders Program (ELP) in 2002, upon realizing that new leaders are needed for a new generation. This October 12, she will be graduating her ninth class of emerging leaders. “After a decade of working with nearly 350 young leaders, the Braintree resident [Penney] has a clearer vision of where the region’s corporate world is headed.” The Emerging Leaders Program alumni are poised to make a difference in the Boston business world by working together collaboratively and across sectors. The ELP stresses collaborative leadership, team work, civic engagement, and corporate social responsibility. Learn more about the Emerging Leaders Program.

Congratulations to our 40 Under 40 Honorees

Tue, Aug 24, 2010 - 12:19 pm

David Howse
David Howse
Johanna Storella
Johanna Storella
Eduardo Tobon
Eduardo Tobon
Eduardo Tobon (‘03) of Sovereign Bank, David Howse (‘05) of the Boston Children’s Chorus, and Johanna Storella (‘08) of the Massachusetts Convention Center Authority have all been named to the Boston Business Journal’s 40 Under 40 which recognizes emerging business leaders in Greater Boston. The BBJ will hold a celebration event to honor the 2010 40 Under 40 class on Oct. 7, 2010, from 6-9 p.m. at the State Room, 60 State Street, in Boston.

Other Emerging Leaders Program Fellows past recipients include: Lisa Davis, Tomeeka Farrington, Marlo Folgelman, Paul Francisco, Sonal Gandhi, Jeremy Liu, Georgianna Melendez, and Jennifer Waldner.

Next Generation Leadership: Insights from Emerging Leaders

Wed, Jun 16, 2010 - 9:39 am

See our video about the book
Now available from Palgrave/Macmillan, “Next Generation Leadership: Insights from Emerging Leaders” by Sherry H. Penney and Patricia Akemi Neilson. The incoming generations will soon be the leaders of the future and their values will drive the innovation of tomorrow. While many talented young professionals are eager and ready to take on these leadership roles, their voices are rarely heard. This book brings together the stories and ideas of the future from a survey of nearly 300 emerging leaders to get their point of view and thoughts about how organizations need to change in order to develop effective leaders of tomorrow, including how:

  • Collaboration will replace the former top-down leadership model
  • Cultural diversity will add value to organizations
  • Corporate social responsibility is a necessary ingredient for organizational success
  • Family friendly policies will permeate the workplace

Available at: Palgrave Macmillan | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Borders

See pictures from our Book Party

Read more about the book

ELP Authors Interviewed for Urban Update

Wed, Mar 3, 2010 - 4:44 pm

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Taping of Urban Update. More pictures >>

Sherry Penney, Founding Director of the ELP was interviewed by Byron Barnett of WHDH-TV’s Urban Update. The interview focused on the Program’s Anthology, Voices of the Future: Emerging Leaders, published in the summer of 2009. The anthology contains 20 essays written by ELP alumni. Three essayists were also interviewed for the program: Ron Bell, Office of the Governor, Dr. Chi Huang, Lahey Clinic, and Mary Tolikas, PhD, Wyss Institute. The air date was March 7 on WHDH-TV, channel 7. 

The Gift that Keeps on Giving: CSR Report

Fri, Feb 5, 2010 - 4:51 pm

JD Chesloff
JD Chesloff, Mass Business Roundtable

Described by JD Chesloff of the Massachusetts Business Roundtable as “the gift that keeps on giving” is the report written by ELP alumni from the 2008 cohort for their team project on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). The team was asked to survey businesses, corporate philanthropy leaders and trade associations about how they are using CSR and corporate philanthropy strategically to recruit and retain employees. Based on the information, they were asked to write a report to provide models and recommendations to corporations hoping to successfully use CSR as a recruitment and retention strategy. The report received some positive press, and most recently, the latest edition of the American Bar Association’s CSR Journal features the CSR report as the first story. Members of the 2008 team who worked on the primer include: Bridget L. Hindle, Sovereign Bank; Cuong P. Hoang, Mott Philanthropic; Chris Lavoie, AT&T; Raj Menon, NSTAR; Quintina Palmer-Woods, Brown Brothers and Harriman; and Shaké Sulikyan, Harvard Medical School. For more information about the primer see News: ELP Corporate Social Responsibility Team works with MA Business Roundtable to Issue a Report.

UMass Boston, Emerging Leaders Program & State Street Corporation

Fri, Dec 11, 2009 - 4:29 pm

Ron Logue
Ron Logue, CEO State Street. More pictures >>

On December 8 the Office of University Advancement at UMass Boston hosted an alumni event for State Street employees at the UMass Club. The event was held to celebrate the on-going partnership between the UMass System and State Street Corporation. State Street CEO Ron Logue spoke highly of the caliber of UMass grads now working at State Street, and about the worker loyalty to the company. Logue recognized that the UMass Boston Emerging Leaders Program was the obvious next step in developing the future leadership of State Street. On hand for the celebration in addition to Ron Logue was UMass President Jack Wilson, UMass Boston Chancellor Keith Motley, and College of Management Dean Philip Quaglieri. State Street ELP Fellows in attendance included R.J. Donofrio, Stephen Finocchio, Lunie Jean Philippe, and Pauliina Swartz. 

Jeff Taylor has them up and dancing at the Emerging Leaders October 7 luncheon

Tue, Sep 1, 2009 - 10:11 am

ELP Luncheon
Jeff Taylor, Keynote Speaker, ELP Luncheon October 7. More pictures >>

“If you’re going to show up, you might as well run the meeting.”

“If you’re nervous, you’re in the process of learning something.”

These were just two of the pieces of advice from Jeff Taylor, the Bay State entrepreneur (and UMass graduate) who founded the billion dollar job search website Monster.com. He left Monster in 2005 to start a new project called Eons, a web site designed to cater to the millions of Americans aged 55 or older, and, in 2008, he started Tributes.com, a site for obituaries resources.

“We’re here to think about possibilities,” he said. “You have two choices: be insane or be an entrepreneur. When everyone thinks you’re crazy and you still think you have a good idea, you’re an entrepreneur,” he added.  “Nervous excitement, getting the endorphins going, makes the ideas bigger.”

Taylor advised the Emerging Leaders on how to get traction for their ideas, using musicians as an example. Musicians are entrepreneurs, starting small, building momentum, adding more and more elements, he said, and, by the end of his talk, he had the entire audience on its feet, clapping rhythmically, waving arms, and, yes, dancing.

His own career, he explained, has “gone in and around, up and down, not in a straight line.  It doesn’t matter how you do it; you just have to do it.”

Perspective is important.  “The internet has been around for 5000 days. We have changed the world. What will happen in the next 5000 days?,” he asked.  You have to keep your eye on the big picture – in Boston and in each of our lives.

ELP Corporate Social Responsibility Team works with MA Business Roundtable to Issue a Report

Mon, Jun 1, 2009 - 1:45 pm

Bridget Hindle
Bridget Hindle, 2008 cohort member presenting team findings on CSR

The Massachusetts Business Roundtable (MBR), in collaboration with the University of Massachusetts Boston Emerging Leaders Program, released a report that documents a significant shift in corporate philanthropy. The Spring 2009 Report, Corporate Social Responsibility and Employee Recruitment and Retention: A Primer, concludes that corporate social responsibility (CSR) has emerged as a critical strategy for employers looking to recruit and retain talent. Members of the 2008 team who worked on the primer include: Bridget L. Hindle, Sovereign Bank; Cuong P. Hoang, Mott Philanthropic; Chris Lavoie, AT&T; Raj Menon, NSTAR; Quintina Palmer-Woods, Brown Brothers and Harriman; and Shaké Sulikyan, Pine Manor College. To learn out more about the findings, please see Boston Globe Op Ed: A core value that helps the bottom line, and the Boston Business Journal: Study: More CEOs say good works boost recruiting.

 

A core value that helps the bottom line

Sat, May 30, 2009 - 12:28 pm

The Boston Globe
Op Ed by Perri Petricca and Sherry Penney |  May 30, 2009
Read article on line at Boston.com

WITH THE slowed economy, major law firms across the country are now paying first-year associates not to work at their firms, but, rather, to pursue full-time work for a nonprofit for a year. This sophisticated, coordinated Corporate Social Responsibility strategy to recruit and retain talent while making a philanthropic contribution to the community makes good business sense.

In the past, businesses large and small would engage in philanthropy based upon a sense of responsibility to their community. Today, with greater competition for customers and for talent both nationally and internationally, Corporate Social Responsibility is proving to be a powerful tool not only for community engagement but for bottom-line success.

A new report by the Massachusetts Business Roundtable, in collaboration with the Emerging Leaders Program at the University of Massachusetts at Boston, documents significant shifts in corporate philanthropy, and concludes that Corporate Social Responsibility has emerged as a critical strategy for employers looking to recruit and retain talent. The report finds that “as more and more companies try to differentiate themselves from their competitors, they must treat Corporate Social Responsibility as far more than charity. CSR must be a core component of their business model.”

The report recommends five key findings of best practices:

Create and maintain a clear link to the company’s mission and secure executive endorsement.

Corporate leaders emphasize that Corporate Social Responsibility is central to their corporate cultures. Philanthropic decisions are inextricable from the companies’ business decisions, and these decisions flow from the top down and from the bottom up.

Engage employees at all levels as decision makers and leaders.

Corporate philanthropy and volunteer programs are opportunities for employees from throughout the company to become engaged citizens, both with their communities and with each other. Well-designed programs provide mechanisms for garnering input from employees and give employees choices as to how they might contribute.

Leverage employees’ skills and their ability to make positive contributions to the community.

Deploying their skills to benefit a community can give employees confidence as well as help the community see the corporation in a new light.

Provide opportunities for employees to develop new skills.

Social responsibility programs provide valuable opportunities for employees to become engaged in new ways. When employees take on new roles outside the corporation, they are learning new skills, and their coworkers can recognize strengths that might not be obvious in the workplace. CSR can help make a company a workplace of choice.

Encourage teamwork through group volunteer programs.

Group volunteer programs allow team members to work with each other in new ways. Employees can gain a better understanding of their coworkers and appreciate talents that may not be apparent within the work environment.

In addition, the report suggests components of corporate citizenship that can help maximize the impact of a company’s social responsibility efforts, including: forming meaningful partnerships with nonprofits; using core competencies - donating skills as well as money; working with nonprofits on issues that align with business objectives; and learning from mission-driven organizations.

Even in a down economy, businesses want to attract and retain top young professionals. Corporate philanthropy can be a way to get them here and keep them. Even when every budget item is being scrutinized, it’s important for companies to remember long-term goals and keep social responsibility as part of their strategic mix.

Perri Petricca is the CEO of Petricca Industries and chair of the Massachusetts Business Roundtable’s Task Force on Corporate Social Responsibility. Sherry Penney is founding director of the UMass-Boston Emerging Leaders Program. 

Study: More CEOs say good works boost recruiting

Mon, May 18, 2009 - 10:51 am

Reprint from the Boston Business Journal | May 29, 2009
By Mary Moore

A report issued by the Massachusetts Business Roundtable shows that Boston-area companies are incorporating social responsibility initiatives in their business plans not just because they are good for the community, but also because they help recruit and retain workers.

This marks a shift in corporate philanthropy since the Roundtable released its Primer for Strategic Corporate Philanthropy in 2000, which noted that corporate responsibility was beginning to evolve from community impact to bottom line impact. The most recent report shows that the evolution, indeed, has taken place.
Boston struggles to maintain its college grads as they move into the workforce, and the Round Table report underscores that philanthropy is a factor making some local companies more attractive to younger workers.

The Roundtable issued the report in collaboration with the University of Massachusetts Boston Emerging Leaders Program. A team from the Emerging Leaders Program started working on the report last summer, interviewing 20 Massachusetts companies about their corporate social responsibility activities—predominantly large companies and representing a cross-section of industries.

“Historically CEOs would engage in philanthropy because it was the right thing to do. They wanted to be good corporate citizens,” said J.D. Chesloff, deputy director of the Massachusetts Business Roundtable. “Now there’s a good buiness case to incorporating it into their business plan. There’s a bottom line impact to it, in addition to being good for all the other community reasons.”

Based on the findings from the 20 companies included in the research, the report suggests five ways companies can build a culture of social responsibility:

  • Create and maintain a clear link to the company’s mission and secure executive endorsement;
  • Engage employees at all levels as decision makers and leaders in regard to CSR targets and activities;
  • Leverage employees’ skills and their ability to make positive contributions to the community;
  • Provide opportunities for employees to develop new skills; and
  • Encourage teamwork through group volunteer programs.

“A lot of it is around a company being authentic about wanting to do something in the community and listening to what the employees are interested in doing and connecting it to the values of the company,” said Ellen Remmer, CEO of The Philanthropic Initiative Inc., a nonprofit that promotes strategic philanthropy and advises donors.

MASSACHUSETTS BUSINESS ROUNDTABLE
The Massachusetts Business Roundtable is a statewide public affairs organization of chief executive officers and area executives of the state’s leading companies representing a full range of Massachusetts industry and business enterprise.  The Roundtable’s mission is to inform the Commonwealth’s elected and appointed leaders by applying the knowledge, experience, insight and unique managerial perspective of its membership to the resolution of complex public policy issues. Through research, evaluation and communication, the Massachusetts Business Roundtable strives to influence the state’s public policy agenda, and develop and articulate long-term views, programs and policies that promote the economic and social vitality of Massachusetts.

UMASS BOSTON EMERGING LEADERS PROGRAM
The Emerging Leaders Program is an executive training program for Greater Boston area professionals.  Program participants enhance their individual leadership skills and learn how to work effectively with other leaders toward specific goals. The ten-month program for “Fellows” chosen includes a weeklong seminar, followed by monthly meetings and team projects.  Fellows hone their individual leadership skills in several areas, including networking, communication, conflict resolution, the political process, entrepreneurship, media relations and teamwork. The program stresses the collaborative leadership model, in which leaders share resources, networks, intelligence, perspectives, and assets to achieve common goals.  Fellows will increase their knowledge of the cultural framework that determines how Greater Boston and other major urban areas function.

Chair of NYSE explores regulation and long-term planning with UMass Boston Emerging Leaders

Tue, Mar 3, 2009 - 11:59 am

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ELP Alumni from State Street Corporation with Marsh Carter (pictured in center)

On April 28, 2009, Marsh Carter, Chairman of the New York Stock Exchange Group and Deputy Chairman of the parent company NYSE Euronext, met with the UMass Boston Emerging Leaders Program Alumni and Fellows to discuss the current state of the economy. The attendees explored with Carter ideas on how tomorrow’s leaders can prevent future economic downfalls. See pictures from this event.

Emerging Leaders Program

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2006 Fellows

Leadership of a business or a community need not be left to chance. That’s what underlies the UMass Boston Emerging Leaders Program. The Emerging Leaders Program discovers and empowers leaders for tomorrow—skillful and accomplished leaders from all sectors of our community who will be moving into major leadership positions in their organizations.

Strengthening Capacities for Leadership The Emerging Leaders Program is an executive training program for professionals in the Greater Boston area.  In the program participants will enhance their individual leadership skills and learn how to work effectively with other leaders toward specific goals. The Program selects a diverse group of high potential rising leaders from the corporate, nonprofit and public sectors to participate in a 9-month long leadership development program consisting of 90 hours of “in class” sessions.
The Program starts in September 2014 with a week-long leadership immersion seminar. Subsequent meetings are on the third Thursday of each month through April, with an additional session in June for the team project presentation. For exact dates, please see our program overview.

The Program has four major components:

  • Leadership skill sessions facilitated by subject matter experts from the UMass Boston College of Management and other leading institutions
  • Dialogue with Greater Boston’s current leaders on leadership lessons
  • Reflection on one’s personal leadership style
  • Teamwork— teams working collaboratively on real projects affecting the Greater Boston region

The Emerging Leaders Program stresses the collaborative leadership model, in which leaders share resources, networks, intelligence, perspectives, and assets to achieve common goals.  At its conclusion, Fellows have honed their individual leadership skills in several areas, including objectivity, change management, networking, communication, conflict resolution, entrepreneurship, strategic planning and teamwork.

Invest in your future leaders. To nominate an emerging leader from your organization, please go to our on-line form, provide the required information, and hit submit. Once we receive the nomination, your nominee will be sent an email with an invitation to apply to the program.

More About the Program:

Schedule
News
Our Speakers
Our Fellows
Team Projects

 

Civic Projects

Learning about and living the collaborative leadership model

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Panelist Donna Latson Gittens of MORE Advertising. See more pictures >>.
On October 3, 2012 the Emerging Leaders Program presented the findings from the 2012 team projects.  The 31 fellows in the 2012 cohort worked with various organizations including the Mass Business Roundtable (MBR), Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP), Boston Tenant Coalition (BTC) and the Jamaica Plain Neighborhood Development Corporation (JPNDC), the Center for Social Policy, the Trotter Institute, and the Center for Collaborative Leadership. Two projects addressed improving health outcomes, drawing lessons from corporate wellness plans as well as expanding awareness of care options for homeless people. Two projects addressed the importance of healthy places to live, including affordable housing, and economic districts enlivened by the arts. One team explored broader funding sources to support innovative research on poverty. And one team worked with the Center for Collaborative Leadership to support our own ability to advance the wisdom of collaborative leadership, the vision of a thriving region, and the continuous engagement of a new generation of leaders.

Supporting Healthy Lives and Vibrant Places was hosted by the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. Representatives from each team presented findings. They are: Kara Boniface, MassBio; Jenna Dodd, Boston Globe; Kelly Dougherty, Tufts Medical Center; Ryan Dunlevy, Rapid7; Charles Smith, Eastern Bank; and Mila Thigpen, Celebrity Series. A panel including John Auerbach, Commissioner, Department of Public Health; Aaron Gornstein, Undersecretary, Department of Housing and Community Development; Donna Latson Gittens, Founder & CEO MORE Advertising; and Jacqueline P. Palladino, Senior Vice President, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston responded to the findings. Each of the panelists agreed that there is a need for emerging leaders to be civically engaged, and they were impressed by the scope of the projects and the work the teams had done on behalf of their clients.

Linda Kowalcky, Deputy Director for Institutional Sector Management of the Boston Redevelopment Authority, gave closing remarks on behalf of the Mayor’s office. In her statement, she noted several value propositions of the Emerging Leaders Program that are critically needed in today’s organizations. They include: fostering leadership development; building networks across sectors; and leadership that reflects the diversity of the city of Boston.

Read the Executive Summary | Download the Power Point Presentation



Making a Difference on Pressing Economic and Social Issues

Read Boston.com article

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Howard Leibowitz, City of Boston
More pictures >>

Creating a stable and healthy economy is vital for the people who live in the Boston region, the organizations that employ them, and the investors who look to our region for innovation. Current social and economic challenges include ensuring affordable and equitably accessible housing for the people who do the essential work of the local economy, supporting low wage workers so that their work sustains both their families and their organizations in a steady and ongoing way, and providing healthy activity for children to curb the obesity epidemic.

Seven teams from the 2011 cohort of Emerging Leaders engaged these issues, starting with a collaborative process of learning about the issues from community stakeholders and non-profit leaders, and then crafting projects that made a difference in important and concrete ways.

On October 4, 2011, ELP Fellows: Andrew Russell, Museum of Fine Arts; Tim Sullivan, Massachusetts AFL-CIO; Tom Yeulenski, Tufts Health Plan; Raul Porras, EMC; Jennifer Thibadeau, Raytheon; Michael McCarthy, The Boston Globe and Carl Guerin, The Boston Company Asset Management presented the findings of their respective ELP teams to a number of community and business stakeholders.

After the presentation, Howard Leibowitz, Chief of Projects and Partnerships for the City of Boston spent a few minutes addressing the team’s findings. Overall, he was impressed with their efforts and urged them to “keep doing what you’re doing.”

A panel of stakeholders also addressed the findings – they included: Deb Felton of Milton Fuller Housing Corporation, Christine Green of the Trefler Foundation and Fred Ramos of State Street Corporation. The panel was moderated by ELP Team Project Facilitator, and UMass Boston Associate Professor in the College of Management, Maureen Scully. Felton’s remarks focused the strength of having emerging leaders engaged in making a difference in their communities.  She also talked to the inter-generational dialogues that have been enabled by this work – bringing all voices to the table to understand and address issues. Green stressed the catalytic impact of the team projects stating that they create potential for positive change. Ramos noted the reality that many civic projects need funding, and the funding comes from the for-profit world. He stressed that collaborative leaders engaging in a civic project need to demonstrate the impact in order to gain the financial support.

The session concluded with additional dialogue around the impact of the team projects, the importance of cross-collaboration between the sectors and how the UMass Boston Emerging Leaders Program facilitates that process.

For more information about the projects, please download the Executive Summary. The event was sponsored by State Street Corporation. 



Creating a Stable and Healthy Economy: Fresh Views from Emerging Leaders

2010 Presenters Team
2010 ELP Presenter’s Team. See more pictures>>

On October 20, 2010, seven Emerging Leaders Program fellows presented, Creating a Stable and Healthy Economy: Fresh Views from Emerging Leaders. The presentation was a result of the work of forty-four Fellows in the 2010 Emerging Leaders Program in collaboration with the Center for Social Policy at UMass Boston on their “reshaping poverty policy” initiative.  The Fellows used their professional skills to analyze data and create awareness campaigns, in turn getting a deeper view of how their civic engagement can make a difference in addressing social issues that affect both businesses and communities. The Fellows examined factors that affect housing and family homelessness, working closely with three organizations, whose participation was made possible by the Hyams Foundation: Boston Tenant Coalition, Greater Boston Fair Housing Center, and Homes for Families.

The fellows looked at:

  • Understanding unintended consequences of work support policies for working families: A fresh alternative
  • Supporting families with good working conditions in low wage jobs
  • Keeping tenants in homes: Effects of foreclosures on families
  • Generating support for affordable housing: Creating a marketing and multi-media messaging campaign
  • Making all communities welcoming: Race and Place dialogues in Greater Boston today

Judith Kurland, Chief of Partnerships and Programs, Mayor’s Office, City of Boston offered responses and reflections on the projects. She stated that we need to concentrate on how to move the ideas presented by our Fellows forward. Panelists from the Boston Tenant Coalition, Greater Boston Fair Housing Center, Homes for Families, and Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development offered remarks as well.

Our ELP presenters were: David Leonard, Boston Public Library; Daylana Ervin-Parker, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts; Paul Rabiner, Genzyme; Maija Pratt Rojas, State Street Corporation; Beth Harubin, Tufts Medical Center; and Joel Connor, Community Academy of Science & Health. 



Connecting Boston to the World

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Audience listening to Mayor Menino. More pictures>>

Are you a connector? If you’re an active agent, a booster for metropolitan Boston, you may be a connector.  Connectors’ enthusiasm helps to promote the city’s economic assets to the international business community and stimulate interest in the competitive advantages this region offers.  Making connections and energizing young professionals is the goal of a new non-profit organization, Boston World Partnerships by use of its innovative website. As part of a nine month effort by the Emerging Leaders Program Fellows in the 2009 cohort, eight Fellows presented their ideas for enhancing the website to Mayor Menino and other stakeholders on September 30th. They included Nora Blake, Sodexo; Carolyn Eggert, Children’s Trust Fund; Susie Ikeda, Genzyme; Monica Kachru, NStar; Jason MacFadyen, Visiting Nurses; Mark Michaud, MCCA; Stephen Naso, Sovereign Bank; and Douglas New, Putnam. The Fellows offered website strategies to raise global awareness of the competitive advantages that Boston offers to growing businesses. BWP’s overarching goal is to strengthen Greater Boston’s economy, expanding the range of opportunities available to all. After research and analysis, our teams of Fellows were able to suggest to the Mayor some ways to make the site even more effective.  BWP has definite potential to help engage young professionals in Greater Boston and enhance our position in the global arena. Read the Executive Report: Emerging Leaders Program Team Projects in Collaboration with Boston World Partnerships

Thank You For Your Nomination!

We will review the application and contact you soon.

Our Fellows 2015

The 2015 cohort of the Emerging Leaders Program consists of a select group of professionals from Greater Boston corporations, nonprofit organizations, and state and local government. Upon graduation, they will join the network of 523 alumni.

Michael AbdelahadPartners Community Healthcare, Inc.
Joe Allen-BlackBoston Globe
Julie AsherCenter on the Developing Child, Harvard University
George AtanasovML Strategies
Shana BellusTufts Medical Center
Yogendra BundelaNeighborhood Health Plan
Rebecca BurkeBlue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts
Kimberly CameronBoston Red Sox
Colin CareyState Street Corporation
Regine ChrispinMetropolitan Boston Housing Partnership
Catherine CollinsJohn Hancock Financial
Alaina CoppolaMassport
Susan CushingSantander Bank, N.A.
Brianna DeGennaroFederal Reserve Bank of Boston
Colleen DohertyEastern Bank
Ayoka DrakeMassachusetts Supplier Diversity Office
Aaron FarberMassachusetts Eye and Ear
Marissa FerberCradles to Crayon
Tara FultonBlue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts
Raza HaiderCitizens Bank
Brian HubbardNortheast Utilities
Kevin HulmeBrigham & Women’s Hospital
Nicole HumbliasJohn Hancock Financial
Michelle LandersUrban Land Institute
Joseph LavitaBlue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts
Sue PitsiosComcast
Victoria PottsTJX Companies
Gillian PressmanGeneration Citizen
Ken RobertsSantander Bank, N.A.
Seth RogersCitizens Bank
Blain SadlerBrightcove
Malisa SchuylerTufts Medical Center
Benjamin SheehanNortheast Utilities
Erica SmithMassachusetts Convention Center Authority
William StoutEMC Corporation
Natalia UrtubeyCollege Bound Dorchester
Andrew VebberSantander Bank, N.A.
Michael VisocchiComcast
Doug WareSuffolk Constructions
Tawana WattsProspect Hill Academy Charter School
Mark WittSantander Bank, N.A.

 

Back to Top

Our Speakers

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Liz Walker, Keynote Speaker, ELP Luncheon, October 23, 2008

The program draws upon UMass Boston and other leading private and public sector institutions for its faculty and speakers.

Each year of the program we are fortunate to have the top executives and civic leaders in the Boston area volunteer to speak about their individual “Path to Leadership” at our ELP forums. The 2015 cohort has heard from Sherry Penney, Founder of the Center for Collaborative Leadership; Amy Latimer, President of the TD Garden; Michelle Shell, Director of the MCCA board of advisors; Jose Masso, Communications Director at Massport; Dani Monroe, President of Center Focus International; and Rick Jakious, CEO of the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network to name a few. To take a look at the remaining 2015 Emerging Leaders Program line up, visit the forum calendar.

Each year we hold our Annual ELP Luncheon to celebrate the graduation of each cohort of emerging leaders. Past keynote speakers include Dr. Ronald Heifetz, Mayor Thomas Menino, Dr. Rosabeth Moss Kanter, The Honorable Michael Dukakis, Robert Kraft, Ted Kelly, Marshall Carter, The Honorable Edward Kennedy, Paul Levy, The Honorable Deval Patrick, Liz Walker, Jeff Taylor, Founder of Monster.com, and Dr. Randal Pinkett, Chairman and CEO, BCT Partners, Margaret McKenna, former President of the Walmart Foundation, Jeff Swartz, former CEO of Timberland, and Dr. Kerry Healey, President of Babson College. The keynote speaker for the June 2014 lunch was John Fish, Chairman and CEO of Suffolk Construction.

Other prominent speakers include:
Marsh Carter, New York Stock Exchange
Ruth Bramson, Girls Scouts of Eastern Massachusetts
Nathan Pusey, Commerce Bank
Bridget Hindle, Santander
Rick Friedel, AT&T
Nadine Chakar, Vicary Graham and John Herlihy, The Bank of New York Mellon
Ellen Zane, Tufts Medical Center
Kenneth Montgomery and Paul Connolly, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston
Donna Latson Gittens, causemedia
Gloria Larson, Bentley University
Hannah Grove and Joseph Chow, State Street Corporation
Reverend Ray Hammond, Ten Point Coalition
Barbara Robidoux, Frank Hauck and Bob Basiliere, EMC Corporation
Alan Trefler, Pegasystems
Joan Wallace Benjamin, The Home for Little Wanderers
Donna Cupelo, Verizon
Robert Matthews and Jerry Sargent, Citizens Bank
Cleve Killingsworth, William Van Fassen, Andrew Dreyfus, Steve Booma, Pat Gilligan and Fredi Shonkoff of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts
Wayne Budd, Goodwin Proctor
Gail Deegan, EMC Corporation Board of Directors
Christopher Mayer, The Boston Globe
Elaine Ullian and Dr. Barry Zuckerman, Boston Medical Center
Dr. Chi Huang, Lahey Clinic
Diane Darling, Effective Networking
Rosalind Gorin, HN Gorin Associates
Sheryl Marshall, Business Development Consultant
Chazy Dowaliby, the Patriot Ledger
Marita Rivera, WGBH Educational Foundation
Marjorie Arons-Barron, Barron Associates Worldwide
Joanna Lau, Lau Technologies
Clayton Turnbull, Waldin Group
Javier Marin, Hispanic News

Our Alumni

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ELP Alumni Lisa DeAngelis, Jabes Rojas, and Jodi Wolin

The Center for Collaborative Leadership has been fortunate for the last eleven years to work intensely with a talented group of young professionals whom we call “emerging leaders.”  Some 457 of them have participated in the Emerging Leaders Program (ELP). To date, six Senior Fellows have been named to the Governor’s administration and approximately 33% of our alumni serve on boards of directors or boards of advisors. At least 40% of the participants have reported promotions in their positions. With eleven years behind us, we have seen the ELP Alumni take on leadership positions of increasing responsibility in the organizations and communities and have become true civic leaders in the Greater Boston region.  For the Emerging Leaders alumni, service and leadership go hand in hand.  Leaders apply their skills to help their community and in doing so strengthen their own leadership abilities. 

Linked In

ELP alum Darius Thompson has set up an ELP Alumni Group on LinkedIn. Joining will allow you to find and contact other ELP Alumni members on LinkedIn. If you are an ELP fellow and would like more information on joining this group, please contact Andrea Wight at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

About Alumnet

In 2007, the Emerging Leaders Program team topic was: How to Retain Young Professionals in Massachusetts. One of the team’s tasks was to “develop an alumni network of leadership programs in the Boston Region.” This team consisted of Carmelle Bonhometre (Association of Haitian Women), Perry Conrad and Sidney Rodrigues (both from Raytheon), Michael Crowley (Blue Cross Blue Shield), and Renee LeFevre (Boston Redevelopment Authority).  They named their team “Alumnet” and began the process of coming up with a project to retain young professionals in Boston. The team decided to create an ELP website where Boston leaders and program alumni would be featured, along with a calendar of events, an ELP directory, links to other sites of interest, a message board and career information that may be helpful to young professionals.  The Center for Collaborative Leadership is grateful for all of the work that was done to create this site, and we know our ELP Alum will benefit greatly with all it has to offer. Visit Alumnet!

ELP Newsletters

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Click on these links to read past ELP newsletters online:
Issue 49: September 2014
Issue 48: June 2014
Issue 47: May 2014
Issue 46: March 2014
Issue 45: February 2014
Issue 44: January 2014
Issue 43: November 2013
Issue 42: September 2013
Issue 41: June 2013
Issue 40: April 2013
Issue 39: February 2013
Issue 38: December 2012
Issue 37: October 2012
Issue 36: August 2012
Issue 35: June 2012
Issue 34: April 2012
Issue 33: February 2012
Issue 32: September 2011
Issue 31: July 2011
Issue 30: May 2011
Issue 29: April 2011
Issue 28: February 2011
Issue 27: December 2010
Issue 26: October/November 2010
Issue 25: October 2010
Issue 24: August 2010
Issue 23: June 2010
Issue 22: March 2010, ELP on YouTube
Issue 21: February 2010
Issue 20: December 2009
Issue 19: October/November 2009
Issue 18: August 2009
Issue 17: June/July 2009
Issue 16: May 2009
Issue 15: March 2009
Issue 14: January 2009
Issue 13: November/December 2008
Issue 12: October 2008
Issue 11: August 2008
Issue 10: June/July 2008
Issue 09: May/June 2008
Issue 08: March/April 2008
Issue 07: February/March 2008
Issue 06: February 2008
Issue 05: December 2007
Issue 04: October 2007
Issue 03: September 2007
Issue 02: August 2007
Issue 01: June 2007

 

 

 

 

Alumni Board

Joining the ELP Alumni Board is a one year commitment.* Executive Committee (Officers and Committee Chairs) meetings are held once a month. Full board meetings take place every other month. The full board consists of the Executive Committee and the Class Representatives. Most meetings are convened via conference call and in person meetings will be held quarterly.

The 2014 - 2015 Alumni Board

Name Class Position Email address
Stephen Roger 2008 Past Chair .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Darlene Ellis-Donahue 2013 Chair .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Deanna Yameen 2003 Vice Chair .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Beth Miller 2014 Fundraising Co-Chair .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Charles Smith 2012 Fundraising Co-Chair .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Katie Hauser 2013 Communications Chair .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Lori Wells Prew 2014 Networking Social Co-Chair .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Steve Record 2014 Networking Social Co-Chair .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Carmine Guarino 2004 Programming Chair .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Meredith (Price) Tremblay 2012 Recruitment Chair .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

Name Class Position Email address
TBD 2002 Class Rep  
Alicine Francois 2003 Class Rep .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
TBD 2004 Class Rep  
Ron Bell 2005 Class Rep .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
TBD 2006 Class Rep  
TBD 2007 Class Rep  
TBD 2008 Class Rep  
TBD 2009 Class Rep  
Danielle Prentis 2010 Class Rep .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
TBD 2011 Class Rep
Andrea Reardon 2012 Class Rep .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Tina Potenti 2013 Class Rep .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Kenechukwu Anadu 2014 Class Rep .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)



ELP Alumni Network Executive Committee Elected Positions

Officers:

The Chair is responsible for overseeing the ELP Alumni Board and presides at all board meetings; additionally, the Chair represents the ELP Alumni at events and other meetings, as needed. (See “Vice Chair” for the “Chair” election process).

The Vice Chair is a two-year commitment.* After the first year, the Vice Chair becomes the Chair. The Vice Chair’s responsibilities are to work closely with the Chair to implement the mission of the Alumni Network.

The Fundraising Chair is responsible for identifying and following through on fundraising opportunities primarily for ELP sustainability and includes efforts in raising scholarship funds and soliciting for ELP luncheon sponsors. The Chair will work closely with ELP staff to establish a fundraising plan that incorporates a series of appropriate vehicles, such as special events, direct mail, product sales, etc. while maintaining cost effectiveness. The Chair will take the lead in certain outreach efforts, such as identifying, cultivating and soliciting major donors. The Chair is also responsible for involving all board members in fundraising, such as requesting board members make telephone calls to ask for support.


Committee Chairs:

The Social Committee Chair is responsible for planning network building, social-focused events that promote opportunities for Fellows to reunite and to make new connections.  While the focus is social, it will promote opportunities to expand one’s individual network.

The Communications Committee Chair is responsible for assisting Center staff in marketing the Emerging Leaders Program to potential nominators and fellows, including formulating a best practices strategy on reaching out to new markets successfully. This will include both internal and external communications and rely on tools ranging from social media (primarily Linked In and FaceBook), press releases, e-newsletters, and blogs, thus creating an active on-line social networking community. Chair will assist Center staff in editing marketing materials. 

The Recruitment Committee Chair is responsible for helping to identify prospects for future participation in the Emerging Leaders Program, as well as identifying companies and/or industries that have not yet sent individuals to the program. Recruitment Chair will also attend information sessions to talk about the program. On occasion recruitment chair will attend social networking events to promote ELP to attendees.

The Program Committee Chair is responsible for holding meetings to brainstorm ideas for program offerings and polling Senior Fellows to determine which offerings are the most desirable. Chair will also assist in planning programs in partnership with Center staff.

 

ELP Alumni Network Elected Positions

Class Representatives (11):
The Class Representative is an invaluable link between the Representative’s respective cohort, the Alumni Board and the Center’s Leadership Team. Each Representative is responsible for attending meetings and/or conference calls every other month throughout the year to voice their respective cohorts’ concerns & issues, while providing feedback to the Alumni Board & Center’s Leadership Team.

Class Representatives will be charged with publicizing ELP Alumni and Alumni-focused events through email to their class. Representatives will also solicit their class for updates for the ELP Exchange Newsletter.

Finally, on occasion the Class Representatives will be asked to assist the various Program Chairs & Alumni Board members in planning events for their class and the ELP as a whole. 

The Class Representative position is ideally suited for the alumnus who enjoys being in communication with his/her classmates.

ELP Alumni Network Executive Committee Mission Statement

Chair and Officers of the Board are charged with working in a collegial and mutually supportive relationship with Center Staff to ensure the successful achievement of annual and long range goals that promote, keep and set the mission / vision of the Emerging Leaders Program.

The Chair and Vice Chair are changed with recruiting and cultivating a well-balanced and well-equipped board. The Chair is charged with orienting new board members, ensuring that they have adequate materials and understanding of their roles and responsibilities. The Chair will establish an effective communications network to keep board members apprised of activities through newsletters, board and committee minutes, media reports, phone calls, thank you notes, etc.

The Chair and Vice Chair will annually conduct a self-assessment of the board and report back to the board with recommendations. This may also include revising board member job descriptions based on the needs of the ELP and the Alumni Board.



UMass eyes philanthropy to lure young professionals

Fri, Oct 24, 2008 - 1:15 pm

Reprint from the Boston Business Journal | October 24, 2008
Philanthropy File | Mary Moore

With Boston struggling to retain young professionals, the University of Massachusetts-Boston’s Emerging Leaders program found that corporate philanthropy might just be the way to keep them here.

Seven teams of Emerging Leaders explored whether civic engagement could be the glue to bond peers their age to the Boston region.

Massachusetts lost 300,000 residents between 2000 and 2007, many of them between 25 and 40 years old, said Andrew Sum, director of the Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University.

The Emerging Leaders project was not about young professionals gathering on Saturday mornings at a soup kitchen, albeit commendable volunteerism, but rather exploring how they can leverage their executive-level skills and apply them to the nonprofit sector.

The teams each worked on different niche projects with various corporate and nonprofit partners, ranging from The Bank of New York Mellon and the Massachusetts Business Roundtable to Hunt Alternatives and the Catalogue for Philanthropy.

Not surprising, the 49 Emerging Leaders found that, based on their own experience, corporate philanthropy does create networks that could help retain young professionals, especially when they collaborate with colleagues from other organizations.

“We did our own debrief on the projects, and they definitely said, ‘I have a whole different view of what my career could look like with civic engagement woven into it,’ ” said Maureen Scully, assistant professor of management at UMass-Boston and a faculty affiliate for the Emerging Leaders.

“One of the things we’re puzzling about is what creates retention in organizations and in the region. Why does Boston bleed young professionals? Philanthropy bonds them here and the chance to work in cross sector teams,” she said.

The team members who worked with the Catalogue for Philanthropy came from banking, finance, media, government, the nonprofit sector and education. Together, they helped develop marketing plans for two products the organization is about to launch: an educational book that looks at the definition and roots of philanthropy and a Web directory to help the public navigate charitable organizations.

Emerging Leaders recommended the Catalogue for Philanthropy to move in the direction of a Web directory – and quickly.

“What we found is that it’s the right time for CFP to be doing something like this,” said Michelle Caldeira, an Emerging Leader and director of corporate and foundation relations for the Pine Street Inn.

Bridget Hindle, director of organizational and professional development for Sovereign Bank, was among the six Emerging Leaders who worked with the Mass. Business Roundtable to update best practices for corporate social responsibility.

Encouraging more companies to implement those best practices is how corporate philanthropy could make the kind of impact the Emerging Leaders envision.

“Companies really find the value in being strong corporate citizens, but the majority of them don’t have formal programs,” said Hindle. “Corporations really need to look at the future and look at the workforce and what the workforce is going to be looking for.”

For many small businesses nationwide, the current economic turmoil is limiting their ability to make charitable contributions, but the turmoil has not entirely closed their checkbooks to nonprofit organizations.

A survey of more than 1,000 small businesses located in cities across the country showed that 38 percent of them contributed less in the past year. Yet, 47 percent said they gave the same amount and 14 percent donated more.

Conducted for the Chronicle of Philanthropy and Advanta Bank Corp., the study of small businesses — defined as those with fewer than 500 employees and annual revenue between $100,000 and $250,000 — was conducted by Chamberlain Research Consultants.

The median small business contribution to charity last year was between $500 and $2,000 in cash.

Sixty-six percent of the small businesses included in the survey said they make cash contributions, 51 percent volunteer, 41 percent provide pro bono services and 39 percent contribute products.

Social-service nonprofits were the biggest winners among small businesses, garnering 62 percent of the contributions. Education initiatives, health charities, arts institutions and environmental causes also received small business support.

Mary Moore covers nonprofit organizations and philanthropy.

She can be reached at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Leadership Essays Book Project

Next Generation Leadership: Insights from Emerging Leaders

See our video about the book

Now available from Palgrave/Macmillan, “Next Generation Leadership: Insights from Emerging Leaders”. The voices of nearly 300 emerging leaders are captured in this book as the authors, Sherry Penney and Patricia Neilson, look at the important ways in which Generations X and Y will transform leadership. Here are some of the reviews:

“The incoming generations will soon be the leaders of the future and their values will drive the innovation of tomorrow. While many talented young professionals are eager and ready to take on these leadership roles, their voices are rarely heard. This book brings together the stories and ideas of the future from a survey of nearly 300 emerging leaders to get their point of view and thoughts about how organizations need to change in order to develop effective leaders of tomorrow.”—Ellen M. Zane, President & CEO, Tufts Medical Center

“Next Generation Leadership is a welcome shout-out from young leaders about how they want all of us to collaborate to shape the future. This hopeful, insightful book shows why values and opportunities must become central to attracting and motivating the best talent.”—Rosabeth Moss Kanter, Harvard Business School Professor, Director of the Harvard Advanced Leadership Initiative, and author of Confidence and SuperCorp

“Next Generation Leadership offers unique insight from future leaders regarding their most closely held values.  Honesty, integrity, inclusion and social responsibility will be more critical than ever to creating and leading effective organizations.  In order to effectively ‘pass the torch’ to a new generation of leaders, it’s important that we listen to them now, and adapt to potential shifts in leadership focus.”—Rick Friedel, Vice President, AT&T Service Management

“There is no better way to learn about leadership than through the eyes and voices of emerging leaders who aspire to greatness. Their fresh, hopeful and surprisingly perceptive views force all of us, even the most seasoned leaders, to recalibrate how we think about diversity, gender, ethics and what it really means to be a leader. This book speaks to a vibrant future, and everyone will take something valuable from it.”—Ralph M. James, Executive Director, Executive Education, Harvard Business School

Voices of the Future: Emerging Leaders

Voices of the Future Book Cover
Voices of the Future: Emerging Leaders
The Center for Collaborative Leadership at UMass Boston received money from an anonymous donor and a grant for $25,000 from State Street Corporation to work on a project to solicit and publish the voices of emerging leaders about their thoughts on leadership and the challenges leaders face. The idea for the book originated from the Center’s senior scholar, Sue Reamer in collaboration with our founding director, Sherry Penney and director, Patricia Neilson. UMass Boston Professors Peter Kiang and Maureen Scully, and Marjorie Arons-Barron from Barron Associates Worldwide have been instrumental in the books development.

Authors are from the Center’s Emerging Leaders Program (ELP) and represent the major business, non-profit and governmental organizations in the Greater Boston region.

Read Excerpts from Voices of the Future: Emerging Leaders

Chapter One: Emerging Leaders Reach Out. Essays from Armindo Goncalves (with Emily Rubin), Chi-Cheng Huang, Nathan Pusey (with Emily Rubin), and Mary Tolikas

Chapter Two: Voices of Inclusion. Essays from Georgianna Melendez, David Halbert, Ron Bell (with Emily Rubin), Sandra Best Bailly, and Paul Francisco (with Emily Rubin)

Chapter Three: Growing Into Leadership and the Future. Essays from Pauliina Swartz, Michael Rawan, Hugh Drummond, Amanda Trojan, Anne Marie Boursiquot King, Andrea Hurwitz, and David Dance

Chapter Four: Leadership and Balance. Essays from Lisa DeAngelis and Deanna Yameen, Anonymous, and Christie Getto Young

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ELP Fellows in the News


Lynette Correa ‘12 received ALPFA’s Excellence in Service to the Community Award for her dedication to helping kids succeed through her organization Career Coaching 4 Kidz. The awards were presented on November 15, 2012. 

Diane Darling ‘06 workshop called, “Water Cooler Football” was featured in the Boston Globe and on CBS Sunday Morning.   

David Ford ‘13 of EMC was recently awarded a citation for excellence at EMC for the impact of his efforts driving disability awareness. The award was presented to David by EMC’s disability employee resource group (DERG). DERG provides a support network and knowledge base for its employees with disabilities or family members with special needs. David was also featured in the Boston Business Journal Human Capital section for being named to the Easter Seals of Massachusetts’ board of directors.

Maia Germain ‘06 of State Street Corporation was honored at the South Shore’s 40 Under 40 Awards. The award recognizes emerging South Shore leaders under the age of 40 for their professional accomplishments, civic engagement and demonstrated leadership potential.

Rick Jakious ‘09 was featured in the October 25, 2012 massnonprofit.org newsletter. “In many ways the sector has made immeasurable gains by adopting many of the best qualities of the private sector, but the nonprofit sector has a unique quality that is better suited for the landscape - its willingness and ability to collaborate,” said Rick Jakious, CEO of the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network (MNN). 

Michael James ‘06 received Color Magazine’s All-Inclusive Publisher’s Award. The committee recognized Michael’s dedication to giving back to the community, including his work with The Northeast Human Resources Association, the City-Wide Dialogues on Ethnic & Racial Diversity, Commonwealth Compact Higher Education Steering Committee and Bike Rides for Peace. 

Georgianna Melendez ‘04 of Commonwealth Compact wrote an article published in the Boston Business Journal September 14, 2012 edition titled Biz schools attack corporate diversity at its roots.

Lauren Smith ‘04 has been appointed Interim Commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. 

Tim Sullivan ‘11 was quoted in the September 7, 2012 issue of the Boston Business Journal in: Massachusetts union membership holds steady: Despite a hit to public sector.

Craig Williams ‘07 was named Chief Operating Officer at Tufts Medical Center on November 6, 2012. “Since joining the organization in 2008, Craig has worked closely with doctors, nurses and other professionals to enhance our outpatient services and improve our operating efficiencies,” said Eric Beyer, President and CEO of Tufts Medical Center. 
















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Donate to ELP

Why Donate?

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Fellow from AIDS Action Committee
One of the most important aspects of the Emerging Leaders Program is that we enhance cross-sector networking. In our research we found that leadership development strategies that work for businesses also work for nonprofits and for those in the public sector—all face similar issues and all benefit from knowing and working with those in other sectors. Our Fellows find enormous value in expanding their networks so that emerging leaders in business network more frequently with those in nonprofits and with those in other business fields. The synergies created are an unanticipated but profound finding.  When emerging leaders become more familiar with other sectors, understanding is enhanced and new and lasting connections are forged.

However, while corporations can afford to offer professional development opportunities to their employees, non-profit and public sectors cannot. Nominees from non-profit and government organizations need help with funding, and we ask for your support to provide scholarships for these emerging leaders.

How to Donate

If you are interested in contributing to the Sherry H. Penney Leadership Fund, please send a check to the Emerging Leaders Program | Center for Collaborative Leadership | UMass Boston | 100 Morrissey Blvd. | Boston, MA 02125. Or donate on line through the UMass Boston University Advancement website.

For more information, please call or email Andrea Wight at (617) 287-3890 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Thank you. 

Our Alumni

The Center for Collaborative Leadership has been fortunate for the last seven years to work intensely with a talented group of young professionals whom we call “emerging leaders.”  Some 295 of them have participated in the Emerging Leaders Program (ELP).  To date, six Senior Fellows (alumni) have been named to the Governor’s administration and over 35 alumni serve on boards of directors or boards of advisors. At least 40% of the participants have reported promotions in their positions. With seven years behind us, we have seen the ELP Alumni take on leadership positions of increasing responsibility in the organizations and communities and have become true civic leaders in the Greater Boston region.

ELP Schedule September 2014 - 2015 Cohort

Orientation Meeting:

Each selected fellow will be invited to an orientation meeting on August 13 at UMass Boston, Chancellor’s Conference Room from 5:30-7:30PM. At this time fellows will meet other participants and also receive program materials.

Week-long Introductory Seminar:

In the September week, fellows meet several of the most prominent leaders from the region who relate their own leadership experiences and challenges. They also are introduced to the essential skills needed to become collaborative leaders. These skills will be further developed throughout the program. In addition, they form teams that will work on important economic and civic issues for the next several months.

The September 2014 introductory seminar is scheduled for September 8 through 12 at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center.  The program day starts at 8:15 a.m. and ends at 5:00 p.m. Topics covered include: Leadership Models and Qualities, Objectivity, Effective Delegation, Conflict Resolution, and Adaptive and Inclusive Leadership.

Monthly Forums:

Monthly forums are held on the third Thursday of every month*, beginning in October.  The full schedule of the September 2014-15 cohort forum dates is listed below.  At these forums, current leaders will again speak on leadership topics.  Each forum also includes additional skill development and provides opportunities for team meetings. The program day starts at 8:15 a.m. and ends at 5:00 p.m. These forums are at partner locations throughout greater Boston.
 

         
  • October 16, 2014 at Massachusetts Eye and Ear | Topic: Change and Strategy
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  • November 20, 2014 at NStar (Mass Ave. facility) | Topic: Entrepreneurship and Appreciative Inquiry
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  • January 15, 2015 at Boston Globe  | Topic: Effective Communication
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  • February 12, 2015 at Santander* note 2nd Thursday | Topic: Leadership and Community
  •      
  • March 19, 2015 at Location TBD | Topic: Authentic Leadership
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  • April 16, 2015 at Location TBD  | Topic: Team Project Presentation
  •      
  • June 3, 2015 (TBC)  at TBD note team project presentation to stakeholders
  •      
  • June 19, 2015 (TBC) at TBD annual luncheon 


Elective Program Elements

In addition to the core program, we offer several elective events.  These are not required to successfully complete the program, but they have proven valuable to past participants.  We also offer special sessions that are open to both the current Fellows and alumni.  There will also be assorted networking opportunities outside of the core program.

 

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Our History

The Center for Collaborative Leadership at UMass Boston was founded in 2001 by Dr. Sherry Penney, chancellor at UMass Boston from 1988 to 2000. The Center for Collaborative Leadership is charged with nourishing “emerging” leadership in metropolitan Boston and with exploring and refining the collaborative leadership model. To support the center’s efforts to create a more diverse pool of emerging leaders, State Street Corporation provided an initial grant for $250,000 in 2000, support that has been crucial to launching the program. Additional support has been provided by The Boston Foundation, the Boston Globe Foundation, the AT&T Foundation, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, Verizon New England, Sovereign Bank, Fleet Financial Foundation, John Hancock Financial Services and The Bank of New York Mellon through the Eugene Fay Trust. The center also performs research on leadership-related topics. Its work will help to create a new generation of leaders for the Greater Boston region and will have broad implications for the theory and practice of leadership.  

Our Goals

The mission of the Emerging Leaders Program at the Center for Leadership at University of Massachusetts Boston is to identify and then develop future leaders for the Greater Boston region who are diverse and reflect the changing demography of our city, who practice a collaborative style of leadership and who are civically engaged.

Four goals were established to fulfill the mission.

  1. Select emerging leaders who are diverse by race, gender, and profession who will enhance their networking skills with other emerging leaders.

  2. Expose the emerging leaders to a variety of Boston’s current leaders in order that they understand the existing leadership profile and experience a variety of leadership styles.

  3. Enhance the leadership skills of the emerging leaders in communication, negotiation, teamwork, project development and completion, and knowledge of civic/city issues.

  4. Increase the understanding and practice of inclusive and collaborative leadership.

 

Board of Advisors


Joe Bator
Senior Vice President
Eastern Bank


Ruth Bramson
CEO (retired)
Girl Scouts of Eastern Massachusetts


Christine Carmody
Senior Vice President, Human Resources
Northeast Utilities


JD Chesloff
Executive Director
Massachusetts Business Roundtable


John Ciccarelli
Assoc. Vice Chancellor Government Relations
University of Massachusetts Boston


William “Mo” Cowan
COO
ML Strategies


Darlene Ellis-Donahue
Chair
Emerging Leaders Program Alumni Board
Eastern Bank


Grace K. Fey
Principal
Grace Fey Advisors


Paul Francisco
Vice President- Diversity Consultant Global Inclusion
State Street Corporation


Rick Friedel
Vice President
AT&T Global Service Management


Paul Guzzi
President and CEO
Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce


Ray Hammer
General Manager
Westin Copley Place


Reverend Ray Hammond
Pastor, Bethel AME Church
Ten Point Coalition


Hubie Jones
City Year, Inc.


Rosabeth Moss Kanter
Professor
Harvard Business School


Gloria Larson
President
Bentley University


Ralph Martin, Esq.
Northeastern University


José Massó, III
Communications Director
Massachusetts Port Authority


Chris Mayer
Consultant
The Boston Globe


Travis McCready
Vice President for Programs
The Boston Foundation


Kenneth Montgomery
First Vice President & COO
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston


Lisa Murray
Senior Vice President
RBS Citizens


Sherry Penney
Founder
Center for Collaborative Leadership
University of Massachusetts Boston


Nathan Pusey
Managing Director
Commerce Bank
Chair


Philip L. Quaglieri
Professor
College of Management
University of Massachusetts Boston


Sue Reamer
Senior Scholar
Center for Collaborative Leadership


Jason Robart
Senior Vice President
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts


James Rooney
Executive Director
Massachusetts Convention Center Authority


Maureen Scully
Interim Dean
College of Management
University of Massachusetts Boston


Tim Sullivan
Chief of Staff IGR/Sr. Advisor to the Mayor for External Affairs
City of Boston


Pamela Trefler
Trustee
Trefler Foundation


Leroy Walker
Enterprise HR Executive Consultant


Craig Williams
COO
Tufts Medical Center


Rob Williams
VP Marketing Manager
Greater Media


Andrea Zuniga
Communications Manager
Clarks Company, NA

Board of Advisors Emeriti:



Wayne Budd, Esq.
Senior Counsel
Goodwin Proctor LLP


Marshall N. Carter
Deputy Chairman, NYSE Euronext Board
CEO (Retired)
State Street Corporation


Missy Carter
President
Work/Life Decisions


David DeFilippo
Chief Learning Officer
Bank of New York Mellon


Carol Fulp
President
The Partnership


Charles Gifford
Chairman Emeritus
Bank of America


Robert Glassman
Co-Chairman
Wainwright Bank


Rosalind Gorin
President
H.N. Gorin Associates


John Hamill
Board of Directors
Sovereign Bank New England


Robert Haynes
President (retired)
AFL-CIO of Massachusetts


Marian Heard
President and CEO
Oxen Hill Partners


Vivian Huang
Aegis Capital Holding Co., Inc.


Joanne Jaxtimer
Executive Vice President/Director of Corporate Affairs
Bank of New York Mellon


Paul La Camera
General Manager
WBUR


Robert Matthews
Vice Chairman
Citizens Financial Group


Tom May
Chairman and CEO
Northeast Utilities


Cathy Minehan
President (Retired)
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston


Robert Mudge
Senior Vice President Northeast
Verizon


Robert Sheridan
CEO (Retired)
Savings Bank Life Insurance


Elaine Ullian
President and CEO (retired)
Boston Medical Center


William Van Faasen
President and CEO (retired)
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts

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Staff and Faculty

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Lisa DeAngelis is the director for the Center. Lisa brings more than twenty years of divisional and corporate leadership experience to ELP. In her role as a leader within the Human Resource function she created strong business partnerships with line executives helping them to identify, clarify, implement, and achieve aggressive strategic objectives.

Her corporate experience with companies of all sizes - from a 300-person start-up to a 32,000 person Fortune 500 global organization, and such diverse industries as call centers, insurance, construction management and IT consulting - served as a strong platform for her current work. In September 2009, Lisa and her husband leveraged their corporate experience along with her learning’s from the ELP to launch their own business, “Leading with Values” where they coach CEO’s and line executives as they address business and professional challenges by helping them connect to their own capabilities, values, and beliefs, and by helping them structure opportunities to realize the potential of others they work with. Lisa has also helped facilitate the Authentic Leadership Program for the high potential offering at Wharton for the past two years.

Lisa also brings her unique mix of skills and experience to others not yet involved with the corporate world. Specifically, she volunteers with Summer Search, an organization whose mission is to find resilient low-income high school students and inspire them to become responsible and altruistic leaders by providing year-round mentoring, life-changing summer experiences, college advising, and a lasting support network.

Lisa holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Bryant University and a Master of Business Administration degree from Regis University.

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Lawrence (Larry) Moulter is the Executive in Residence at the Center. Larry is an established and respected Boston business leader skilled in building value from under-performing assets. He has repeatedly proven himself in situations that have required strong strategic business development and sales/marketing skills with a focus on profit and cost control. Larry is versatile, flexible, and adaptable.  His record is one of creating strong organizational performance across a wide range of industries including hospitality, entertainment and transportation. As Chairman and CEO of the New Boston Garden Corporation, Larry was the lead executive for the development of a new Boston Garden - the first person to do so in 68 years.

As CEO, he has also led BostonCoach through the depths of the recent recession to emerge as a restructured company with improved customer performance and a sustainably profitable business model. He also broke from the status quo at Woolf Associates by significantly expanding the services of this marketing agency beyond merely athlete representation creating a multi-platform firm.

Larry has turned around the businesses he has led or taken a growth-potential company to the next level through his focus on performance and financial discipline, creative yet controlled revenue-building, and profit management.

He is a values-based business builder, who believes that an organization’s culture breeds, not follows, its success.

He is skilled in relating to all stakeholders. He effectively and transparently communicates and collaborates with executive teams and employees, investors and financiers, government leaders, media and the public.

Larry served as Chief Executive Officer of Boston Coach, a $170 million subsidiary of Fidelity Investments. He was recruited by and reported to Fidelity Chairman Ned Johnson to grow the company through new revenue initiatives. However, the recession forced him to downsize and reposition Boston Coach to become a smaller and more profitable organization without losing its focus on building a strong customer experience. He left when Fidelity divested Boston Coach in early 2013.

Prior to BostonCoach, Larry ran his own strategy consulting firm – Moulter Associates – where he advised companies like Dunkin Brands on their marketing communications and served as interim CEO of a venture-backed advertising services start-up. He has also been Chief Operating Officer of a private $50 million internet content delivery provider and as Chief Executive Officer of Woolf Associates, a marketing agency that he acquired with Ed Eskandarian and Bobby Orr.

Earlier, Larry was recruited to develop and implement a turn-around strategy for the operating company that owned the Boston Garden (host to the Boston Bruins, Celtics, concerts and other events) as its CEO and Chairman. During the next nine years, he changed the organization’s culture, shifted its business model, and generated operating revenue that was seven times greater than during the decade before he arrived. He led the development and construction of the new Boston Garden while also serving as a Director and later Chairman of the NESN Regional Sports Network.

In addition to his service on the New Boston Garden Corporation and NESN boards, he was a mayoral appointee to the Massachusetts Convention Center Authority, a Trustee of Northeastern University, Chair of the Board of the American Liver Foundation New England Chapter, and a Director of the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Boston. He is currently the Chairman of the Board of The Campus Agency, a college marketing company.

Larry holds a BS from Northeastern University and an MA in International Relations from Syracuse University. He also earned his JD from Suffolk University.

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Andrea Wight is the assistant director of the Center for Collaborative Leadership and the Emerging Leaders Program at UMass Boston. She works closely with the director to implement the work of the center.  This includes planning for the Emerging Leaders Program, professional development programs, and events. Along with the ELP Alumni Board, she plays a critical role ensuring the ELP alumni continue to have strong networks and communication outlets through monthly newsletters, emails, Linked in groups, and the center’s website. Andrea maintains and updates the center’s website and takes the lead on communications and public relations on behalf of the center across a variety of medium. Andrea was a fellow in the Greater Boston Chamber’s Women’s Leadership Program 2011-2012. The Program is in collaboration with the Simmons School of Management. She has over eight years of experience in higher education administration from UMass Boston’s College of Public & Community Service where she was the Academic Services Coordinator. Andrea received her BA from Hartwick College in Oneonta, New York.

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Katie Bates is the administrative coordinator of the Center for Collaborative Leadership and the Emerging Leaders Program (ELP) at UMass Boston. She serves as the first point of contact to the internal and external community regarding the Center and the Emerging Leaders Program (ELP). She also assists the director of the Center for Collaborative Leadership with logistics associated with all center and ELP activities and events. Previously, Katie served as a publishing assistant at the Unitarian Universalist Association for Skinner Books. Katie received both her masters and bachelors degrees in English at UMass Boston.

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Sue Reamer, PhD is a Senior Scholar at the Center for Collaborative Leadership.  She holds a registered nurse license and has extensive experience in nursing home administration, public health nursing and public health nursing education.  She sits on the the this Center’s Advisory Board, the UMass Boston’s Center for Women in Politics and Public Policy’s Advisory Board, and the Stonewall Communities Lifelong Learning Institute’s Board.  She is the recipient of the Wonder Woman Award of the Massachusetts Women’s Political Caucus and the Alumni Distinguished Service Award from the Boston University School of Management.  At a brand new stage in her life, for the past four years, she has been delighted to babysit four days a week with her two grandchildren, Alice and Sammy, who live five blocks from her.

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Emerging Leaders Program Faculty

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Marc Lavine is an assistant professor of management at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Marc teaches, conducts research, and consults to companies and nonprofit organizations on issues of change management, leadership development, organizational learning, and social responsibility. Marc has extensive experience leading nonprofit educational programs and social ventures and has served on the boards of numerous nonprofits. He has worked throughout the US and Latin America and founded an award-winning leadership development initiative serving young adults from Northern Ireland. Marc earned his MBA and an MA in education from the University of Michigan and his MS and PhD from The Carroll School of Management at Boston College. Marc serves as the ELP team project facilitator as well as teaches a section on navigating change. 

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Benyamin Lichtenstein, PhD, is an associate professor of entrepreneurship and management in the College of Management at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Benyamin’s research has focused on the dynamics of emergence and innovation in complex systems. His non-linear framework has generated unique insights into leadership, collaboration and sustainability, as well helped understand the creation and transformation of entrepreneurial firms. His scholarship has been published in 45+ articles, many in internationally recognized journals; he’s also written three books; the most recent one, published by Palgrave-MacMillan Press in 2010, is titled: Complexity and the Nexus of Leadership. In addition to his teaching and research, Benyamin is research director for UMass Boston’s Entrepreneurship Center, and research fellow in the Center for Sustainable Enterprise; he has also consulted to entrepreneurs and executives in organizations large and small. Beyond his professional work he finds great joy playing the clarinet and connecting with his artist-wife Sasha and their two children, Simeon and Moriah.


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Lee Teitel teaches courses on leadership development, partnership and networking, and understanding organizations and how to improve them. He directs an innovative multischool effort that focuses on bringing high quality teaching and learning to scale in urban and high need districts. The program, the Executive Leadership Program for Educators, builds on several prior initiatives at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education, Business School, and Kennedy School of Government, and works with state commissioners of education and school superintendents, along with their leadership teams and key stakeholders. Teitel’s research has focused on principal and superintendent leadership development, including those in “alternate” or nontraditional settings, and on interorganizational collaboration and other partnerships, especially between schools and universities. As a consultant, he has worked with numerous individual partnerships, networks, and with a statewide school and teacher improvement efforts. Teitel has worked extensively on executive leadership development with principals and school superintendents, collaborating with KSG colleagues Ron Heifetz and Marty Linsky to set up superintendent networks in Massachusetts and Ohio, and co-facilitating the Connecticut Superintendent Network with HGSE colleague Richard Elmore. Teitel has taught at HGSE for the last seven years as a part-time lecturer and visiting professor (2004-2005). He comes to the School full-time after more than 15 years in teaching and writing about educational leadership at the University of Massachusetts at Boston, where he was full professor and associate chair of the Department of Leadership in Education. Dr. Teitel has an Ed.D. from Harvard University.

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Eben A. Weitzman is an Associate Professor in the Graduate Programs in Dispute Resolution, and in the Public Policy Ph.D. Program, both at the University of Massachusetts Boston.  He received his Ph.D. in social and organizational psychology in 1994 from Columbia University.  His work focuses on conflict within and between groups, with emphases on organizational conflict, cross-cultural conflict, and intergroup relations, and on research methodology.  He does conflict resolution and organizational development work with a wide variety of individuals and organizations in both the public and private sectors, including organizations in health care, education, government, law enforcement, social services, business, and the courts.  He is Reviews Editor for the journal Field Methods, and has consulted on numerous large qualitative research studies in health care and human services.  His recent publications include Problem-solving and Decision-Making in Conflict Resolution, in The Handbook of Conflict Resolution;  Interpersonal Conflicts of Women in Nursing Homes: An Administrative Perspective, in the Journal of Clinical Geropsychology; Interpersonal Negotiation Strategies in a Sample of Older Women, in the Journal of Clinical Geropsychology; Responding to September 11:  A conflict resolution scholar/practitioner’s perspective, in Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy; Analyzing Qualitative Data with Computer Software, in Health Services Research; and the book, Computer Programs for Qualitative Data Analysis (Sage).
 

 

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About Us

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2009 Fellows

The Center for Collaborative Leadership is charged with nourishing “emerging” leadership in metropolitan Boston and with exploring and refining the collaborative leadership model. Through the Emerging Leaders Program (ELP), mid-level professionals in Greater Boston enhance their individual leadership skills and ability to work effectively with others toward significant civic goals. The program stresses collaboration and fosters leadership that is visionary, goal-oriented, and inclusive. Each summer, a new group of “fellows” is chosen. Diverse in profession, race, ethnicity, and gender, and with five to ten years of experience, these fellows have already demonstrated leadership potential through work in corporations, nonprofits, and governmental organizations. Each has been identified by his or her sponsoring organization as an “emerging leader,” talent worth watching and developing.

In the summer of 2007, the ELP won the European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) Excellence in Practice Award. EFMD is a global organization devoted to the continuous improvement of management development. The ELP was selected based on its innovative and creative learning approach, and its effective partnering with the corporate sector.

More About Us:

    Our Staff and Faculty
  Our Board of Advisors
  Our History
  Our Goals

Research

Much of our research is based on evaluations and interviews we conduct in the Emerging Leaders Program with the program participants. We conduct several surveys throughout the cycle of the program, and we also administer the Leadership Practices Inventory to participants at the beginning and end of the program. We review those results to see if participants have progressed in their own leadership development. For over a decade, we have seen positive results on the follow-up LPI.

In addition, a follow up grant from the State Street Foundation provided us an opportunity to learn from organizations that had sent participants to the program. Interviews were conducted with eight of the sending organizations as well as alumni from those organizations to learn about the impact on the organizations as well as the participants. The organizations found the program to have positive effects on recruitment and retention of employees and that participant’s work skills were enhanced after their participation.

We also keep track of indicators of community involvement. Several of our alumni have gone on to prominent boards in the region. One now chairs the Dorchester Board of Trade; another is the Treasurer of the Boston Children’s Chorus, and another is the president of the Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra. Others have gone onto boards for the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, the YWCA, The Red Cross, The Boston Municipal Research Bureau, the Urban League, Boston Healthcare for the Homeless and other prominent boards. We are now frequently called when board appointments are to be made and asked to nominate alums of the Emerging Leaders Program.


Recent publications

  • “Voices of the Future: Leadership for the 21st Century,” Journal of Leadership Studies, Vol. 5,  2011. | abstract
  • Next Generation Leadership: Insights from Emerging Leaders (2010) | more information | purchase on line
  • Voices of the Future: Emerging Leaders (2009) | more information




The University Reporter

Mon, Sep 8, 2008 - 1:12 pm

September 2008, Volume 13, No. 1, page 6

The Center for Collaborative Leadership at UMass Boston has received a grant for $25,000 from State Street Corporation to work on a project to solicit and publish the voices of emerging leaders.

Authors are from the Center’s Emerging Leaders Program (ELP) and represent the major business, non-profit and governmental organizations in the Greater Boston region.  The book will also include survey and focus group data from the participants of the ELP—some 296 emerging leaders.


“Why do Young Professionals Stay in Massachusetts?”

Sun, Mar 2, 2008 - 1:10 pm

March 2, 2008

On Sunday, March 2 Channel 7’s Urban Update featured members of the 2007 Emerging Leaders Program cohort, Sonal Gandhi, BRA; Michael Rawan, Sovereign Bank; Trevor Dunwell, Raytheon; and Director Pat Neilson about the success of the program and about the 2007 group project on “Why Young Professionals Stay in Boston.”

UMass Boston Emerging Leaders Program Tops in Europe

Mon, Jun 25, 2007 - 1:00 pm

June 25, 2007
BostonNow.com

Emerging on top
UMass program takes top honors


The UMass Boston Emerging Leaders Program won top honors last week in an international competition featuring leadership development programs. The European Foundation for Management Development in Brussels voted the Emerging Leaders Program as its choice for the “Excellence in Practice” award. EFMD is a global organization devoted to the continuous improvement of management development and has over 600 member organizations from business, academia, and research centers in the United States, Europe and Asia.

The UMass Boston Emerging Leaders Program won top honors last week in an international competition featuring leadership development programs. The European Foundation for Management Development in Brussels voted the Emerging Leaders Program as its choice for the “Excellence in Practice” award. EFMD is a global organization devoted to the continuous improvement of management development and has over 600 member organizations from business, academia, and research centers in the United States, Europe and Asia. The Emerging Leaders Program (ELP) initially was selected as a finalist based on “innovation and creativity in the learning approach, its effective partnering with the corporate sector, cultural diversity, sustainability and strategies for learning transfer.” The other finalists were Sociale Verzekerings Bank and Nyerode Business Universiteit (Netherlands) and Fujitsu Service and The Danish Leadership Institute (Denmark).  The Emerging Leaders Program, in its sixth year, was launched by a grant from State Street Corporation, which continues its vital role in the program. ELP invites senior executives in corporations and non-profits to nominate young professionals in the Greater Boston area.

 

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Growing Boston’s New Leaders

Fri, Nov 17, 2006 - 12:50 pm

Reprint from The Boston Business Journal - November 17, 2006
http://boston.bizjournals.com/boston/stories/2006/11/20/editorial2.html

By Marshall N. Carter

Our region and our city are poised for significant leadership changes as more of our current leaders retire or move on. It is critical that outstanding individuals be ready and willing to take their places. Iconic names from the past, from Richard Hill to John Larkin Thompson, guided our community with distinction and made notable contributions to civic life. But the new leadership will not and should not look like that of old. It must be more inclusive and respond to national and regional demographic changes. It must also be more collaborative—a characteristic not always the norm in Boston. It is clear that building such leadership cannot be left to chance.

Many pundits and opiners worry what this all means for our future. I, however, am encouraged. Recently, I had the opportunity to meet with many of the 199 young professionals in the Emerging Leaders Program at the College of Management at UMass-Boston when the program celebrated its fifth anniversary and honored Hubie Jones, recognizing his commitment to renewed and inclusive leadership for the future. These young professionals are a diverse group with over 40 percent individuals of color and more than half females. Moreover, they represent the major businesses and nonprofits in our region.

In this leadership development program they have learned about a variety of leadership styles and have met with many of the current leaders in our city and region. They have studied, and also practiced, collaboration. They have learned what the best leaders know: Strength in an organization comes from bringing together many ideas from different individuals and sources. They have honed their skills in communication, in dealing with the media and the political process, in negotiation and dispute resolution. They have met with rising entrepreneurs, and they have examined work-family issues.

It has been encouraging to see those from banking, financial services, telecommunications and retail working with individuals from health care and nonprofit organizations as well as governmental agencies. They have much in common and benefit from the insights of their colleagues, but they also have learned how to accept and respect differences. Society needs leaders with different points of view, and these young leaders have learned how to work through differences and reach consensus.

Moreover, they have thought about and acted upon many of the issues facing our region: work force development, the new immigrant populations, charter schools, health care and housing. They have met with the mayor of Boston and other business and civic leaders to report their findings on these complex issues.

In 2007, they will be examining the reasons young professionals choose the Greater Boston area and why they stay here. We already know why some young people leave the region—we also need to know why others stay and what we can do to ensure they remain here to build their personal and professional lives.

Most of these emerging leaders have committed themselves to Greater Boston. Many of them have already been asked to join prominent nonprofit boards, and more of them will be asked to do so in the future. Their next step is for-profit and public boards, and they are ready. Many also have assumed roles of increased responsibility in their companies, and their current bosses report that this leadership training has changed for the better the way they work in their organizations.

This talented group of young professionals can make a real difference in our city and region. They are here. They are ready for roles of increased responsibility. And they represent talent ready to be tapped. Shame on us if we prevent that from happening.

Marshall N. Carter is the chairman of the New York Stock Exchange and is former chairman and CEO of State Street Bank.

  © 2006 American City Business Journals Inc.

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Photo of quoted person
“I learned a lot about collaborative leadership, networking, difficult conversations, diversity at the workplace, culture, politics, communication, and issues in the Greater Boston area. Also, I learned to be humble, have humility and to follow your heart. ”
Ketal Sonchhatra
Partners Community HealthCare
ELP Fellow 2009